Amazon caught making and pushing counterfeit products

SuperMatt

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The documents reveal how Amazon’s private-brands team in India secretly exploited internal data from Amazon.in to copy products sold by other companies, and then offered them on its platform. The employees also stoked sales of Amazon private-brand products by rigging Amazon’s search results so that the company’s products would appear, as one 2016 strategy report for India put it, “in the first 2 or three … search results” when customers were shopping on Amazon.in.

Among the victims of the strategy: a popular shirt brand in India, John Miller, which is owned by a company whose chief executive is Kishore Biyani, known as the country’s “retail king.” Amazon decided to “follow the measurements of” John Miller shirts down to the neck circumference and sleeve length, the document states.

Amazon have repeatedly denied doing anything like this. They are out-and-out liars and crooks.

Bezos denied this when testifying before Congress. He could be convicted for lying under oath. Yeah, who am I kidding… he probably owns more than half of Congress.
 

Eric

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Not surprising..... I will only buy name-brand items from Amazon and which are sold and shipped by Amazon rather than through their Marketplace.
Yep, two things I don't trust from them are reviews and products they make.
 

Herdfan

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Not surprising..... I will only buy name-brand items from Amazon and which are sold and shipped by Amazon rather than through their Marketplace.

I usually do the same, but some reputable companies use Amazon as their online store front. Lutron is one example.
 

Clix Pix

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A lot of times I will go into Amazon and look at reviews for an item -- say, a coffeemaker -- and read those, get an idea of whether the item is something I'd want, then go to my local Best Buy or some other store which actually has the thing ready for me to see in person and then bring home. A lot of reviews I quickly skip over when it seems as though there is just a little too much enthusiasm going on for the product.... and if there are an awful lot of negative reviews, too, I question that as well.

Again, I'm not even going to consider a product made by "Amazon Basics" or whatever, I'm going to be looking at a product made by brand names that I've known and trusted for a long time.
 
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