Banning books

SuperMatt

Site Master
Posts
7,690
Reaction score
14,520
A woman in Arkansas was caught on tape threatening to go on a shooting spree at her local library.


Leaked audio from a Moms for Liberty meeting in Lonoke County, Arkansas, reveals a member of the chapter’s leadership flippantly threatening gun violence against librarians.

In the audio obtained by Media Matters, the chapter’s head of communications and media, Melissa “Missy” Bosch, complained about librarians in the district, saying, “I’m telling you, if I was -- any mental issues, they would all be plowed down with a freaking gun by now.”
Seems like this lady could have her guns taken away by a red flag law! Oh yeah, it‘s Arkansas; they don’t have one. And they oppose the new bill in Congress to even encourage states to think about passing some. Because a mass shooting of evil librarians by patriots like Missy would be a service to the community, amirite?
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
5,997
Reaction score
12,687
Location
Catskill Mountains
A woman in Arkansas was caught on tape threatening to go on a shooting spree at her local library.



Seems like this lady could have her guns taken away by a red flag law! Oh yeah, it‘s Arkansas; they don’t have one. And they oppose the new bill in Congress to even encourage states to think about passing some. Because a mass shooting of evil librarians by patriots like Missy would be a service to the community, amirite?

Yeah I'm low on the thrill index the media are pitching w/ regard to the "historic" nature of the first major federal gun legislation to have been passed in decades. To me it's another example of Dems somehow always settling for more crumbs than cake in legislative accomplishments despite having a majority in both houses of Congress. And I can't blame all of that on wackos like Sinema or blue dogs like Manchin.

I don't like being so negative about my own party of registration which is one reason I'm staying off social media this summer.... the other being that we're actually HAVING a decent summer weather-wise up here, so I'm trying to be outside and make the most of it.

When I do pop online and look around, all I see is either hysterical overreaction to everything and anything, or else unrelenting negativity. Seems like the elders of my and the boomer generations have helped steer younger Americans towards some kind of black hole.

Seems so bizarre, since we were once upon a time the activists shoving a recalcitrant and complacent country into the 20th century. Now in the 21st, we've slacked off and allowed the retrograde anti-democrats to shove us all the way back to the 1800s?? Must be time for the pendulum to quit swinging to the right, else we're likely to fall off the fucking coffee table here in a few more minutes...
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
5,997
Reaction score
12,687
Location
Catskill Mountains
Exactly, Liz! Remember the 60's??? What has happened to the rebels, the ones who wanted to implement change and improve things in our society?

tbh I think what happened is that the Democrats' refusal to spend money on campaigns in rural areas caught up with them. At first no one really noticed. Now that things have got to the point where suburban school districts are experiencing book-banning efforts by Republican school board members, maybe the DNC will finally smell the burnt coffee?

It could take decades to recover, and it might be too late since the Rs won't stop at book banning (or overturning Roe either). Next targets: more voting rights shrinkage and doing away with the EPA, the department of education). Meanwhile the Dems struggle to regain relevance they still had earlier in the 21st century.

Excerpt from a Guardian piece about prospects in the Colorado primary election tomorrow:


“National and state Democrats have lost virtually every line of communication with working-class voters in places like the western slope,” said Joel Dyar a longtime community organizer in Grand Junction (Dyar co-founded a Super Pac that opposes Boebert). “They’ve had three decades to work on strategies and they still have no real strategies. There’s no storytelling, no cultural competence, no ladders for new rural talent. They’ve got to make big, brave, generational investments in rural organizing.”

Kathleen Sullivan Kelley encountered this obstacle in the 1980s, when, as a young, single woman in her 20s, she unseated an incumbent Republican state senator in one of the most deeply conservative parts of western Colorado.

“It was a problem back when I ran for the legislature,” she said in a phone interview. “The Democratic party didn’t want to spend money on this area.”

Book-banning, the blind eye of DoJ to consolidation of media outlets (newspapers, TV station ownership), it all adds up to control of information and an eventual lack of transparency about our constitutionally described right to consent to our governance.

What we don't read about or hear about, we don't know. What we don't know steadily bites into our capability to participate in governance. We're already starting to look more like the tinpot-badged banana republics we helped maintain or establish in Central America, and the gun industry doesn't mind the idea that getting another gun can feel like a potential solution to problems we don't even understand and so increasingly express less as discontent and more as fear and rage.

I'm still hopeful that even in rural areas, librarians and teachers --and remaining moderates among school board members-- can manage to raise public awareness that banning books and discussion / instruction of actual American history will not contribute to solving our current problems in the USA. I've spent some time this summer remediating my own understanding of history in the USA in the 20th century, more than half of which I lived through as a kid or young adult, and it's certainly been eye-opening. You can bet your last dollar that American History as taught in the 1940s and 50s might as well have been dressed in a burka. It was a time when fiction by progressives and minorities was hard to lay hands on and readily enough banned when it popped up in mainstream venues like public libraries or classrooms. Feels to me like we're entering another era like that, and I hope it can be nipped in the bud by popular pressure. Our eyes have been opened already, so there's no excuse to go backwards again.
 

SuperMatt

Site Master
Posts
7,690
Reaction score
14,520
tbh I think what happened is that the Democrats' refusal to spend money on campaigns in rural areas caught up with them. At first no one really noticed. Now that things have got to the point where suburban school districts are experiencing book-banning efforts by Republican school board members, maybe the DNC will finally smell the burnt coffee?

It could take decades to recover, and it might be too late since the Rs won't stop at book banning (or overturning Roe either). Next targets: more voting rights shrinkage and doing away with the EPA, the department of education). Meanwhile the Dems struggle to regain relevance they still had earlier in the 21st century.

Excerpt from a Guardian piece about prospects in the Colorado primary election tomorrow:




Book-banning, the blind eye of DoJ to consolidation of media outlets (newspapers, TV station ownership), it all adds up to control of information and an eventual lack of transparency about our constitutionally described right to consent to our governance.

What we don't read about or hear about, we don't know. What we don't know steadily bites into our capability to participate in governance. We're already starting to look more like the tinpot-badged banana republics we helped maintain or establish in Central America, and the gun industry doesn't mind the idea that getting another gun can feel like a potential solution to problems we don't even understand and so increasingly express less as discontent and more as fear and rage.

I'm still hopeful that even in rural areas, librarians and teachers --and remaining moderates among school board members-- can manage to raise public awareness that banning books and discussion / instruction of actual American history will not contribute to solving our current problems in the USA. I've spent some time this summer remediating my own understanding of history in the USA in the 20th century, more than half of which I lived through as a kid or young adult, and it's certainly been eye-opening. You can bet your last dollar that American History as taught in the 1940s and 50s might as well have been dressed in a burka. It was a time when fiction by progressives and minorities was hard to lay hands on and readily enough banned when it popped up in mainstream venues like public libraries or classrooms. Feels to me like we're entering another era like that, and I hope it can be nipped in the bud by popular pressure. Our eyes have been opened already, so there's no excuse to go backwards again.
Sadly, things are getting worse for librarians, especially in Oklahoma.


Library workers across Oklahoma’s Metropolitan Library System (MLS) were shocked this week after receiving instructions to avoid using the word “abortion” and not to help patrons locate abortion-related information on either library computers or their own devices. Workers were warned that they could be held legally liable and face penalties under the state's abortion laws.

“If a staff member gives any information on how to obtain an abortion, then that person may be found personally liable and will also make MLS liable,” says a memo, which was obtained by Motherboard after being emailed to workers at one library branch in the Oklahoma City area. “Civil penalties include a $10,000 fine plus jail time and the staff member will lose their job due to being informed by MLS and disregarding the warning.”
I could have sworn right-wingers made mouth noises about the first amendment before. I guess they forgot all about it.
 

Scepticalscribe

Site Master
Vaccinated
Posts
6,361
Reaction score
9,098
Sadly, things are getting worse for librarians, especially in Oklahoma.



I could have sworn right-wingers made mouth noises about the first amendment before. I guess they forgot all about it.
Horrifying.

And appalling.

And quite simply, utterly and totally shameful.
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
5,997
Reaction score
12,687
Location
Catskill Mountains
It must annoy hell out of the book-banning crowd to realize it's hard to keep ideas off the internetz...

free nypl member access to 2 toni morrison ebooks until 10:31.jpg

Cardholders of the NYPL don't have to queue up at their ebook lending facility to borrow it formally on their SimplyE app, it just says "Get" under those two books now in a special section at top of library offerings.

Could be good to look around your local or regional library system to see if they have similar offerings!
 

Huntn

Whatwerewe talk'n about?
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
4,238
Reaction score
4,219
Location
The Misty Mountains
My hometown is still trying to ban books. I thought they had moved on but no, the crazies are still trying.
Just how many conservative punches to the side of the head does it take for the populace at large to realize that conservatism today (while always self serving) , is not what it was 50 years ago, having been twisted into this corrupt, self serving monster, especially in Texas.

It was better then, but still was racist, still self serving, yet it tended to follow the law, it was actually patriotic, and was even pragmatic in some corners about such things as single payer health care, however It had not yet devolved into corrupt, oppressive, anti-democratic liars they are today.
 

Citysnaps

Elite Member
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
1,252
Reaction score
3,279
Main Camera
iPhone
yet it tended to follow the law, it was actually patriotic, and was even pragmatic in some corners

The biggest difference for sure. Seems Cheney and Kinzinger (and maybe a few others) are the last Rs embracing those tenets.
 

Huntn

Whatwerewe talk'n about?
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
4,238
Reaction score
4,219
Location
The Misty Mountains
The biggest difference for sure. Seems Cheney and Kinzinger (and maybe a few others) are the last Rs embracing those tenets.
If you by chance mean Dick Cheney, he was a big liar, he supported the invasion/Iraq war based on a lie, making sure our intelligence publically supported the idea that Iraq had WMDs. His daughter in contrast seems to have scruples.
 

Citysnaps

Elite Member
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
1,252
Reaction score
3,279
Main Camera
iPhone
If you by chance mean Dick Cheney, he was a big liar, he supported the invasion/Iraq war based on a lie, making sure our intelligence publically supported the idea that Iraq had WMDs. His daughter in contrast seems to have scruples.

I was referring to Liz Cheney. Her father is evil.

Looking back, we should have invaded Mexico or Canada instead. Finding WMD and Al Qaeda there would have been just as likely. Far easier and far less expensive. :)

What really bummed me was how Colin Powell got sucked into that lie; remembering his speech at the UN.
 
Last edited:

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
5,997
Reaction score
12,687
Location
Catskill Mountains
Further on banned books and the existence of, duh, the internet...


Far from the trenches in states like Florida and Texas, organizations in deep-blue New York are stepping into the fray by directly lending 25,000 books to non-residents since spring, including thousands of students living under the bans. The Brooklyn Public Library’s “Books Unbanned” program provides access to its eBook collection and learning databases for people between the ages of 13 and 21.

The library’s program is reaching into Oklahoma, which enacted some of the most sweeping laws last year to ban materials that might cause anyone to “feel discomfort, guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress” because of their race or gender identity.

One Oklahoma high school teacher resigned after suffering backlash for introducing students to the program. Now colleagues, students and community members are making yard signs, and kids are wearing shirts to school advertising the program with a barcode that connects to the BPL website on phones.

“The QR code has become — for lack of a better phrasing — it’s become a symbol of resistance locally in my state,” former Norman High School English teacher Summer Boismier said in an interview. She says she quit in protest, and her teaching license is now in jeopardy, after she provided the code to students.
 

Huntn

Whatwerewe talk'n about?
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
4,238
Reaction score
4,219
Location
The Misty Mountains
Further on banned books and the existence of, duh, the internet...

Wow, in the digital age, what’s next, emulating Iran or China shutting down the internet In the Name of the Lord or in the Name of our power over you! The harder they squeeze, the more we will slip though your fingers.
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Staff Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
5,997
Reaction score
12,687
Location
Catskill Mountains
Wow, in the digital age, what’s next, emulating Iran or China shutting down the internet In the Name of the Lord or in the Name of our power over you! The harder they squeeze, the more we will slip though your fingers.

It will be interesting to see upcoming collisions of assertions in the USA about "misinformation" and "freedom of speech" and "religious freedom" and "big tech" (shorthand for content control especially in big social media platforms) --and how those all end up in attempts to legislate the flow of ideas.
 
Top Bottom