Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

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Clix Pix

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No, he just showed us a few photos of the meal -- it looked delicious! -- and I don't recall him saying where he'd got the recipe or which one he may have used specifically, but he did say he aimed to be as authentic as he could. Next time I'm there on the forum I'll take a second look at his post. He did say something about preparing the Injera from scratch and that it took a couple of days right there before he was ready to move on to preparing the actual stew. He did say that he eased up a bit on some of the spices used in the stew so that both he and his wife could really enjoy the meal without feeling their mouths burning up. He also served it with some wine, and I didn't pay attention to what that was, either. In one photo he showed the (hard-boiled?) egg slices on top of the stew and joked about yes, having both the chicken and the egg......
 
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Clix Pix

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OK, just looked again at the post on Nikon Cafe and this is what the guy wrote:

We had Ethiopian food for dinner tonight.
Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread) made by fermenting Teff flour for 2 days (a la sourdough) and the Ethiopian national dish, Doro Wat, a very spicy chicken stew. Everything was home made, including the Berbere spice mix (a mix of Coriander Seeds, Cumin Seeds, Green Cardamom Seeds, Dried Red Chili Peppers, Whole Allspice Berries, Whole Cloves, Fenugreek Seeds, Black Peppercorns, Sweet Paprika, Ground Cinnamon, Ground Ginger, Ground Turmeric, Ground Nutmeg, and Salt)

Injera is used as an eating utensil. A variety of stews, vegetables and/or salads are placed on a large piece of injera and guests use their right hands to tear portions of the injera which are used for gripping the food. The porous texture of the injera makes it ideal for soaking up the juices.


I read through the thread and he didn't cite any specific recipe, but I think there are some online, and probably a few are more authentic than others. The main focus of his thread was to share the photos, since Nikon Cafe is a photo site, primarily, rather than a cookery site, so he probably didn't feel the need to share the specific recipe or source(s) of such.....
 

Scepticalscribe

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OK, just looked again at the post on Nikon Cafe and this is what the guy wrote:

We had Ethiopian food for dinner tonight.
Injera (Ethiopian Flatbread) made by fermenting Teff flour for 2 days (a la sourdough) and the Ethiopian national dish, Doro Wat, a very spicy chicken stew. Everything was home made, including the Berbere spice mix (a mix of Coriander Seeds, Cumin Seeds, Green Cardamom Seeds, Dried Red Chili Peppers, Whole Allspice Berries, Whole Cloves, Fenugreek Seeds, Black Peppercorns, Sweet Paprika, Ground Cinnamon, Ground Ginger, Ground Turmeric, Ground Nutmeg, and Salt)

Injera is used as an eating utensil. A variety of stews, vegetables and/or salads are placed on a large piece of injera and guests use their right hands to tear portions of the injera which are used for gripping the food. The porous texture of the injera makes it ideal for soaking up the juices.


I read through the thread and he didn't cite any specific recipe, but I think there are some online, and probably a few are more authentic than others. The main focus of his thread was to share the photos, since Nikon Cafe is a photo site, primarily, rather than a cookery site, so he probably didn't feel the need to share the specific recipe or source(s) of such.....

Thanks a million.

If preparing such a dish, I would forego the injera; I'm not a baker, and am agnostic about the pursuit for utter authenticity if it inconveniences (or annoys) me too much - cooking should be fun, after all, rather than a procession of swear words brought about by frustration and growing annoyance, which is expressed in increasing bad temper, the upshot of which is you don't actually get to enjoy the meal.

But a spicy Ethiopian style stew - or, an Ethiopian inspired stew (served with some starch such as bread, - naan bread could work well - or rice, or polenta, or somethings similar, potato, pasta.....) could be a fun dish to try to prepare sometime.
 

lizkat

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In general I am not a bread person but I DO like Naan and pita breads and, yes, both are lovely for dunking right into a juicy curry or some other dish.....

I often enough have for breakfast just a warmed pita cut into 8ths with some hummus when I forgot to make "today's oatmeal yesterday". Don't think I'd do that if I were commuting into an office though... the garlic...
 

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I adore Ethiopian food. But I also love Indian and being able to eat with the bread.
Oh, yes, yum.

In general I am not a bread person but I DO like Naan and pita breads and, yes, both are lovely for dunking right into a juicy curry or some other dish.....
French breads, Italian breads, and, indeed, those dark German breads will all also pass the bread test (as do both naan and pitta breads).
I often enough have for breakfast just a warmed pita cut into 8ths with some hummus when I forgot to make "today's oatmeal yesterday". Don't think I'd do that if I were commuting into an office though... the garlic...
I'll hold back on the garlic - and exercise a degree of commendable restraint - if I am about to visit my dentist; but, rarely otherwise.
We had a beluga lentil braise with naan for dinner tonight. Scrumptious.
Sounds delicious.

No cooking today, as I was studying for (and then, attending) my online French class today.
 

hulugu

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On another forum in which I hang out, someone -- a foodie -- described how he had prepared an Ethiopian meal of Injera and Doro Wat -- it really looked delicious! There are several Ethiopian restaurants downtown in DC -- large Ethiopian population -- but I've never had their food. Maybe when/if things settle down and restaurants are open under more normal conditions, I might find a place to have a new taste experience. Looks and sounds really good, with various spices and the Injera, which is a sourdough sort of flatbread. Rather than use utensils the diner scoops up the Doro Was with the Injera. Since you folks here in this thread are presumably all fond of messing around in the kitchen, I thought I'd mention this intriguing dish, and maybe if some of you haven't prepared it or enjoyed it you might be interested in giving it a try! The guy on Nikon Cafe said he found several good recipes online.
There's a well-loved Ethiopian restaurant here, and it's been a weird experience ordering take-out because if you ate there in normal times, they'd bring you as much Injera as you wanted. But, with take-out you have to tell them how much you want and I'm a little embarrassed to tell them.

Last night was an interesting recipe of an indian-style shepherd's pie. Basically cook the lentils, and vegetables like carrots and celery, and make a gravy. Then, make mashed potatoes, but rather than milk use butter, yogurt, and the potato water. Assemble and roast in the oven.

My son's buddy, who is part of our education pod for COVID, has decided to be a vegetarian, so he came over and just absolutely destroyed his portion. We sent him home with leftovers and the recipe.
 

Scepticalscribe

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There's a well-loved Ethiopian restaurant here, and it's been a weird experience ordering take-out because if you ate there in normal times, they'd bring you as much Injera as you wanted. But, with take-out you have to tell them how much you want and I'm a little embarrassed to tell them.

I'd imagine that they would be happy to learn that some people love their food to the extent where they blush to order more injera.

Last night was an interesting recipe of an indian-style shepherd's pie. Basically cook the lentils, and vegetables like carrots and celery, and make a gravy. Then, make mashed potatoes, but rather than milk use butter, yogurt, and the potato water. Assemble and roast in the oven.

My son's buddy, who is part of our education pod for COVID, has decided to be a vegetarian, so he came over and just absolutely destroyed his portion. We sent him home with leftovers and the recipe.

Sounds as though it was a very tasty dish; care to share the recipe here?

I love a good lentil dish, (and Indian cuisine does lentils - and many vegetarian dishes - exceptionally well), but, with some vegetarian dishes, the challenge is to make them very flavoursome.
 

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Dinner shall be Puy Lentils, and artisan sausages (French style artisan sausages), plus braised leeks in a vinaigrette dressing.

In one sauté pan, the leeks were braised in stock gently for around ten minutes, then removed, and placed in a dish to which French dressing (olive oil, cider vinegar, honey, sea salt, black pepper, minced garlic (about five cloves), and Dijon mustard, all whisked together) has been added; the leeks and the dressing shall be together for well over an hour by the time they are to be served.

In another sauté pan, a classic mirepoix, or soffritto, very finely chopped (diced) carrot, celery and onion were sautéed together until soft; a head of minced garlic (around nine or ten cloves) was added, as was finely chopped pancetta. This was sautéed gently until everything was soft.

At this stage, as I didn't wish to use a tin of tomatoes this evening (that can wait until deeper winter), I added two dessertspoons of tomato puree, and then the puy lentils, and stirred them, seasoning them in the pan, for a few minutes.

Next, I added stock, including the reserved stock that the leeks had been braised in.

The lentils will now simmering away softly for around an hour - perhaps even 70 minutes - in their stock; six, fat, artisan sausages are in a sauté pan; they will be browned and then added to the lentil pan for a further ten or, more likely, twenty minutes.
 
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Huntn

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What's for Thanksgiving 26 Nov 2020?
For 3 of us, we are going simple today, a 6LB roasted chicken, broccoli casserole, sweet potatoes (mashed potatoes for different tastes), and rolls. :)
 

lizkat

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Poached chicken, steamed broccoli florets, mashed sweet potatoes, pan stuffing (sautéed celery, onions, garlic, carrots, mushrooms, toasted artisan bread cubes, chicken broth, spices and herbs -- salt, black pepper, thyme, marjoram, summer savory (like sage)).
 
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