Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

lizkat

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We're on the edge of a back-to-winter week weatherwise, so lentil soup and such will appear on my menu. Time to stash a few soups like that in the freezer for the odd chilly day later on in the month and early May anyhow. And breakfast saw a reversion to oatmeal with apples, raisins, cinnamon...
 

Scepticalscribe

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We're on the edge of a back-to-winter week weatherwise, so lentil soup and such will appear on my menu. Time to stash a few soups like that in the freezer for the odd chilly day later on in the month and early May anyhow. And breakfast saw a reversion to oatmeal with apples, raisins, cinnamon...

Any good lentil soup recipes?

The very best lentil soups I have ever tasted, I had in Turkey - sometimes, even in Istanbul airport, the lentil soup was superb, and airports (nowadays) aren't normally noted for fine dining experiences.

Anyway, the Turks "get" lentils, as they "get" both tea and coffee, for this is one of the few places on the planet - Kenya is another - where both tea and coffee are outstandingly good; usually, it is either one or the other.
 
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lizkat

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Any good lentil soup recipes?

The very best lentil soups I have ever tasted, I had in Turkey - sometimes, even in Istanbul airport, the lentil soup was superb, and airports (nowadays) aren't normally noted for fine dining experiences.

Anyway, the Turks "get" lentils, as they "get" both tea and coffee, for this is one of the few places on the planet - Kenya is another - where both tea and coffee are outstandingly good; usually, it is one or the other.

I completely agree about Turkey and lentils, or at least about Turkish immigrants to the USA, their mothers-in-law from whom the recipes have descended, and great good fortune of any US residents who get to sample the fare. I sure hope a restaurant up in Ithaca of which I'm thinking at the moment has survived the assorted scarcities of the pandemic -- ingredients, customers, wherewithal to keep going.

As for good recipes for lentil soup, alas, mine is pretty generic if satisfying, just the picked-over lentils, rinsed a few times and put into a pot with a couple inches water to cover, plus usually some or all ingredients of a basic mirepoix -- not necessarily sauteed, but if not then also some olive oil into the pot. Then just some thyme or else cumin depending on the mood du jour, with a dash of salt and then more of that to taste along with some black pepper at end. I will often omit onions, garlic if meaning to freeze cooked lentils, as I find the allium family doesn't always improve a dish over time in the cold. If I have omitted them in cooking up some lentils, I will sometimes add some finely chopped chives while heating the thawed lentil dish.
 

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@lizkat:

The thing about those Turkish lentil soups was their inviting aroma - invariably, utterly irresistible and insanely enticing - rather than their (rather mundane) appearance.

Colleagues had recommended Turkish lentil soup - one going so far as to suggest that this (the lentil soup) was worth the price of admission to those fancy airport lounges.

I remember the first time I had one; I was en route from central Asia, over-nighting in Istanbul on the way home, and I was sitting by myself, sipping a beer, relaxing, outside a slightly grotty, rundown, apparently utterly unremarkable, small restaurant/bar.

It was twilight, a lovely velvet twilight, and the local cats were slowly twining and winding themselves around my outstretched feet.

Actually, this was a place that I subsequently realised was an award-winning spot, (it did have discreet awards, and I did look it up), and to which I returned, subsequently, on several occasions, where I was always remembered and welcomed by the staff, who learned - after a few conversations - just exactly where I was working - and in what capacity - at the time; one took me to meet some Syrian refugees who worked in a local carpet shop, and another time the manager invited me to join him over a hubble-bubble when he finished for the night.

Anyway, it lies in a modern side street in the centre of Old Istanbul; I was sitting, relaxed, sipping a well deserved beer, when my nostrils reacted with insane, delirious delight (and desire) to a bowl of vaguely muddy looking soup that was being served to a Muslim family at an adjoining table. I requested a bowl of that soup - it was fantastic - and it was served with stunning warm Turkish bread.

Anyway, anytime after that whenever I passed through Istanbul, I always treated myself to lentil soup, beer and amazing bread, usually in that restaurant.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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Risotto will be served for dinner, a take on the idea of Risotto Primavera:

So, very finely diced onions, carrots, couregttes (zucchini), a half a cup (Le Crueset mug) of frozen peas, a tin of asparagus, around eight, fine, fat, cloves of garlic (thinly sliced and chopped), grated Parmigiano Reggiano, chicken stock, white wine, saffron, butter, (generous quantities), a little olive oil, and, of course, Carnaroli rice.
 

fooferdoggie

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nothing like lasagna for breakfast. it is made with almond noodles and ham to keep the carbs low. I find if I am going to eat stuff that bothers me its best as early as possible.
IMG_2639.jpeg
 

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Dinner this evening is fillet of wild trout sautéed in butter; served with a dish of roasted cherry tomatoes, roasted (very finely sliced) potatoes, and mashed peas (briefly boiled, then sautéed with finely diced and sautéed onion, minced garlic and red chilli pepper, and then mashed).

A dish of aioli (homemade garlic mayonnaise - new season fresh minced garlic) organic, free range egg yolks, and olive oil, to accompany.

Also to accompany is a dish of finely diced chilli pepper with sea salt, and sugar, - which were greeted by my pestle and mortar, that was fun - to which was added a few dessertspoons of fish sauce, mirin sauce, olive oil, and some freshly squeezed lime juice, chopped chives and chopped coriander, whereupon it was all stirred together.

And a glass of two of Italian white wine.
 

lizkat

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Fancy version of otherwise ordinary (and leftover) rice pilaf: I sauteéd up some minced garlic, chopped sweet onion, a few sliced mushrooms, half-rounds of a couple small yellow squash and a handful of green beans, along with half a coarsely chopped red bell pepper and had that with the pilaf along with some stir fried sliced chicken breast and thighs. Worth remembering to do again sometime. Only took half an hour tops and used up things I didn't want to waste.
 

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Dinner is Nasi Goreng (Indonesian Spicy Fried Rice), based on a Gordon Ramsay recipe:

Grated galangal (around two thumbs), and a head of garlic (minced), plus a chopped chilli pepper, and several chives - (Chinese chives) - chopped are sautéed; then three eggs - (organic, free range, already whisked) are added to the pan, and scrambled.

That is when the day old rice is added and fried and stirred fully through; then, a well is made in the rice (and egg), and a generous tablespoon or two of both sambal oelek and rendang paste are added to this well, and fried off, the rice and egg (and spices) stirred through until thoroughly mixed. At that stage, two tablespoons of kecap manis (sweet soya sauce) are added and stirred through.

This was served with poached trout (in stock, slices of lemon, and chopped French onions), and cucumber salad (with salt, sugar, black pepper and freshly squeezed lime juice).
 

lizkat

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Dinner is Nasi Goreng (Indonesian Spicy Fried Rice), based on a Gordon Ramsay recipe:

Grated galangal (around two thumbs), and a head of garlic (minced), plus a chopped chilli pepper, and several chives - (Chinese chives) - chopped are sautéed; then three eggs - (organic, free range, already whisked) are added to the pan, and scrambled.

That is when the day old rice is added and fried and stirred fully through; then, a well is made in the rice (and egg), and a generous tablespoon or two of both sambal oelek and rendang paste are added to this well, and fried off, the rice and egg (and spices) stirred through until thoroughly mixed. At that stage, two tablespoons of kecap manis (sweet soya sauce) are added and stirred through.

This was served with poached trout (in stock, slices of lemon, and chopped French onions), and cucumber salad (with salt, sugar, black pepper and freshly squeezed lime juice).

Wow. Maybe you should think about opening a restaurant... your adventures in the kitchen lately sound worth sitting down to for a price.
 
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