Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

Huntn

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Last night we finished up my shrimp fettuccine leftovers. I think I put that recipe in the recipe thread. Of possible interest, I am cognizant of the over cooking shrimp issue and since the shrimp in this was cooked when the dish was initially made, and I am heating this up in the microwave, I leave the shrimp out when rehearing, place them on the bottom of my plate or bowl, and poor the newly heated noodles on top of them. 🤗
 

oldBCguy

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That looks amazing, and I will bet that it tasted delicious.

Would you care to share the recipe?
Thanks .. and yes, it really did turn out flavourful & tasty. Sorry, no specific recipe - I use what's on-hand, and tend to gauge amounts from past experiences.
- for the stock, just boiled & simmered the shank bone and its attached ham, plus, a few other 'cartilage/bone' pieces of ham I had leftover, w/some large pieces of fresh onion, garlic, and broccoli stem.
- a good number of hours later, removed everything - took out some stock to freeze - and then added diced, fresh onion & brocolli stem, pre-soaked green split peas, diced, cooked ham (from bone & leftovers), pot barley, dried ginger, and such.
For me, it was the ham that really made 'the' difference this time. It was not as salty as past ones have been, and we enjoyed its flavour.
Cheers!!
 

DT

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For me, it was the ham that really made 'the' difference this time. It was not as salty as past ones have been, and we enjoyed its flavour.

Same. :)

Anytime we have a big ham, usually for a holiday of some sort, the remaining ham bits, bone, gets used for some bean soup (sometimes immediately, though we've frozen the ham leftovers a few times too). I get a bag of dry beans, it's usually called "11 bean soup" or "15 bean soup", it's just X different types of beans, and a flavor pack that I pitch.

Soak the beans overnight, big soup pot, some olive oil, a little garlic, lots of onion, simmer for a few, toss in all the ham odds and ends (I usually trim up a bit of the fat), kind of move the meat around, brown it, then add stock (I use the organic low sodium of a grocery brand). Toss in whatever other dry seasonings: chili powder, maybe a tiny bit of cumin, lots of black pepper, white pepper, a shot of cayenne/red pepper - then the beans, low heat, let it go for several hours.

Wind up with something that looks like this :)

IMG_6760.jpg



This was the bean mix when it first went in , you can see there's a lot of different beans, pretty fun!


IMG_6754.jpg
 

oldBCguy

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Same. :)

Anytime we have a big ham, usually for a holiday of some sort, the remaining ham bits, bone, gets used for some bean soup (sometimes immediately, though we've frozen the ham leftovers a few times too). I get a bag of dry beans, it's usually called "11 bean soup" or "15 bean soup", it's just X different types of beans, and a flavor pack that I pitch.

Soak the beans overnight, big soup pot, some olive oil, a little garlic, lots of onion, simmer for a few, toss in all the ham odds and ends (I usually trim up a bit of the fat), kind of move the meat around, brown it, then add stock (I use the organic low sodium of a grocery brand). Toss in whatever other dry seasonings: chili powder, maybe a tiny bit of cumin, lots of black pepper, white pepper, a shot of cayenne/red pepper - then the beans, low heat, let it go for several hours.

Wind up with something that looks like this :)

View attachment 18371


This was the bean mix when it first went in , you can see there's a lot of different beans, pretty fun!


View attachment 18372
... I agree ... looks good, and fun!! I do much the same with a '12 bean' mix (as labelled from a Mediterranean market where I buy them) .. and especially enjoy the mix when just preparing "beans" and such. Beans are so good, and there are so many to try.
 

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.. one of our Thaksgiving meals last weekend -- homemade ham & split pea soup -- stock & soup made from scratch, from the last remains of a recently enjoyed ham shank roast -- made enough soup to freeze a couple of containers worth for another time -- yay! Very Canadian meal for Thanksgiving, and Autumn.

View attachment 18357


The soup looks fantastic. Is that table made partly of tiger (flamed, fiddleback etc anyway chatoyant) maple?!
 

Hrafn

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I tried a peanut butter, banana hamburger (like it also had a beef patty), down in NSB (at a restaurant owned by a winner of Hell's Kitchen of all places ...) and it was, weird. It wasn't really bad, I'm into a sweet + savory kind of vibe, in this case, it didn't really enhance anything, just seemed weird for weird's sake.
I made half a PB and P for dinner. The flavors don't really meld, but are not bad. I may have another.
Edit: I had another half. I'm still working out the proportions, but this time I covered a slice of bread with peanut butter, and then covered the peanut butter with pickles. I think a bit more pickle would have been ok, although I should have let them dry a bit before putting them on.
 
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lizkat

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I made half a PB and P for dinner. The flavors don't really meld, but are not bad. I may have another.
Edit: I had another half. I'm still working out the proportions, but this time I covered a slice of bread with peanut butter, and then covered the peanut butter with pickles. I think a bit more pickle would have been ok, although I should have let them dry a bit before putting them on.

I admit I keep wondering about what this combo would taste like. So are we talking like bread and butter pickles or what they sometimes call "hamburger pickle chips" -- a bit sweet with a little zing of the vinegar in them? I might try putting a handful of those slices on a paper towel for a sec and then in between two thin swipes of PB on a couple slices of light multigrain or artisan white bread. I just opened a jar of those B&B pickles, might give it a try tomorrow.
 

Hrafn

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I admit I keep wondering about what this combo would taste like. So are we talking like bread and butter pickles or what they sometimes call "hamburger pickle chips" -- a bit sweet with a little zing of the vinegar in them? I might try putting a handful of those slices on a paper towel for a sec and then in between two thin swipes of PB on a couple slices of light multigrain or artisan white bread. I just opened a jar of those B&B pickles, might give it a try tomorrow.
I did hamburger dill chips and Skippy smooth pb. Hot, sweet or gherkin would definitely change the taste and texture, as would chunky PB.
 

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Tonight's dinner will be a Trader Joe's receipt hack I randomly found on the internet. It says to used the TJ's ravioli of your choice ( I currently have the Porcini Mushroom & Truffle Ravioli), add petit pois (petite peas), organic baby spinach, a dash of extra virgin olive oil and Boursin cheese. I'll add a baby greens salad with a balsamic vinaigrette and call it dinner.

tjs ravioli boursin hack_sm.png


Tomorrow night I'm make a comfort food casserole with penne, meat, cheese and marinara, so I have something warm and leftovers to easily re-heat for the predicted (and unusual) four days of rain L.A. is expecting.

groundbeef cheesy casserole_sm.jpg
 

Scepticalscribe

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This evening's repast will be a take on Ragù, perfect winter fare:

For the meat, I used shin beef, bone attached, ordered from the organic butcher who has a stall in the weekly farmers' market. This is a cut of meat that requires long, slow, cooking, (minimum fours hours, preferably a lot longer) but the flavour obtained from this method of preparation is well worth the time it takes.

The meat was browned (in a mix of olive oil and butter), and then chopped roughly, seasoned with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, and placed into a large, copper casserole.

A tin of tomatoes, (San Marzano, an excellent Italian brand) was chopped and mashed and added to the casserole, and the tin rinsed with water that was also added to the casserole; next, I added some stock, and half a bottle of Chianti (an Italian red wine).

In the sauté pan, some chopped Guanciale (pig cheek) was sautéed; some recipes call for pancetta, but, I realise that I have come to prefer guanciale for such flavours. The sautéed guanciale was added to the casserole, and the lot then put into a preheated oven (150C, 300F) where it mingled, married, and melded for around an hour.

While the meat was being greeted with heat, a wall of warmth, I prepared the soffritto: two sticks of finely chopped celery, one large (very large) carrot, and two enormous onions, all diced finely, and sautéed in the sauté pan (more olive oil and butter added), which took the best part of an hour (on a low heat) to soften and caramalise; while they were sautéing gently, I added six fat cloves of finely chopped garlic to the pan.

The soffritto and its gloriously softened garlic were then added to the casserole which - upon examination - gave evidence that it was coming along nicely.

After that, around every hour, or every hour and a half, the casserole is removed from the oven, inspected, tasted, stirred, - whereupon a little (a few tablespoons) of milk, (yes, milk, full fat milk) are added - and then returned to the oven for a further hour's alchemy, where the wonder of warmth and heat can work its magic.

Am still debating whether to serve potatoes (boiled or mashed), or pasta, with this dish.
 
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lizkat

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There will be ragù - which will have spent close to seven hours in the oven - for dinner this evening.
Fabulous idea now that winter is trying to get over the threshold.
Am still debating whether to serve potatoes (boiled or mashed), or pasta, with this dish.
I'd probably go for the potatoes, maybe even roasted ones. Boiled red w/ a ittle resistance left great too.
 

shadow puppet

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Am still debating whether to serve potatoes (boiled or mashed), or pasta, with this dish.
I'd probably go for the potatoes, maybe even roasted ones. Boiled red w/ a ittle resistance left great too.
I love roasted baby reds myself. With a sprinkling of parmesan cheese just after coming out of the oven.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Ragù recipes often suggest - or recommend - that gremolata is served as a condiment to accompany the dish: (Gremolata: Finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, grated lemon rind, juice of half a lemon and some olive oil).

Now, as it happens, all of these ingredients were winking at me.

So, the gremolata has been prepared.

Therefore, pasta it will be tonight.

As I shall have seconds (for tomorrow), and the oven will be free, and I will doubtless desire a different side dish to accompany the ragù, roasted potatoes sound as though they will be an excellent idea tomorrow evening; along with, perhaps, a few seasonal roasted apples and pears also.....
 

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Dinner was delicious, though I say so myself.

The meat was so tender - (and tasty) - not just falling off the bone (actually, it had fallen off the bone), but so tender that a knife was not only unnecessary, but it could be cut - effortlessly - with a spoon.
 

Renzatic

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Dinner was delicious, though I say so myself.

The meat was so tender - (and tasty) - not just falling off the bone (actually, it had fallen off the bone), but so tender that a knife was not only unnecessary, but it could be cut - effortlessly - with a spoon.

I tried making beef stir fry. It was disappointing.

My only choice now is to live vicariously through you.
 
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