How do you stop snoring?

Huntn

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My wife has sleep apnea, she uses a cpap. I snore when I lay on my back and sometime on my side, my wife’s I DoD not stop breathing and have to catch my breath. I have not yet a sleep study, but are there any kmown remedies that actually work, short of a cpap machine?

I looked at this online, “Sleep Connection Wrist Device”, then I went to Amazon and looked at reviews shreding this thing. Instead of half off at $60 it was for sale at $17 at Amazon. Sounds like it is unreliable and in trouble.



And this. None of these worked:
 

SuperMatt

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My wife has sleep apnea, she uses a cpap. I snore when I lay on my back and sometime on my side, my wife’s I DoD not stop breathing and have to catch my breath. I have not yet a sleep study, but are there any kmown remedies that actually work, short of a cpap machine?

I looked at this online, “Sleep Connection Wrist Device”, then I went to Amazon and looked at reviews shreding this thing. Instead of half off at $60 it was for sale at $17 at Amazon. Sounds like it is unreliable and in trouble.



And this. None of these worked:
I recently saw this article in the NY Times:

 

Alli

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Get a sleep study. My husband and I both use CPAPs. They are better than a mouth guard, which cannot restart your breathing if you are stopping during the night. It’s a heart risk.
 

fooferdoggie

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My wife could not handle the cpap it always bothered her. being blind did not make it easier.
 

Edd

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I’ve been using this for a couple of years with good results for snoring and apnea. It’s a mouth guard. https://www.snorerx.com/

I had a sleep study and my apnea is in the lower percentile but very real. Tried a CPAP test but it didn’t work out for me. My only concern with the guard is that it beats up your teeth a bit but mine are healthy.
 

fooferdoggie

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Now if your on the receiving end of the snoring these work great.
 
U

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I tried everything outside of surgery. Now on a BiPap and I finally sleep.

It’s not a great solution either; between:
  • Constantly waking up to adjust the head gear,
  • Itching in the nose (I can’t wear the full face mask and other nasal solutions don’t fit well),
  • Powercuts (no power = no sleep),
  • And the occasional waking up to a scene reminiscent of the face hugger in “Alien” where I’ve rolled around twice over so the hose is encircling my neck!,
it can be problematical - that said, despite all these and more I’m convinced I’m alive today because of it.
 

thekev

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I recently saw this article in the NY Times:


They're using incorrect terminology. Mouthguards are what you use for sports. Some people use nightguards for grinding, which is pretty strongly associated with obstructive apnea in the literature. There are different classes of dental devices that are prescribed for that though. Also if you talk to your doctor, I would wager the first thing they'll tell you is to lose weight and exercise, since metrics used in measuring apnea such as AHI are highly correlated with these things, at least according to the literature (disclaimer: I am not a medical professional, and this is not intended as medical advice. Assume I just read a lot, although that article really is using bad terminology.).
 

Scepticalscribe

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I used to think that "slaughter the snorer" (not kill, not murder, not merely end their existence painfully) was an appropriate response - but, perhaps, not.

Mother used to snore - lift the roof snoring, such as you saw in cartoons as a child, you could hear it from the front door, sneaking surreptitiously home.

However, - and this may be of interest - the snoring stopped - for good - once she had a cardiac procedure done (stents and a pace-maker inserted) almost thirteen years before she died.
 

Scepticalscribe

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I used to think that "slaughter the snorer" (not kill, not murder, not merely end their existence painfully) was an appropriate response - but, perhaps, not.

Mother used to snore - lift the roof snoring, such as you saw in cartoons as a child, you could hear it from the front door, sneaking surreptitiously home.

However, - and this may be of interest - the snoring stopped - for good - once she had a cardiac procedure done (stents and a pace-maker inserted) almost thirteen years before she died.

Some years - a very few years - earlier, she also had capillaries, or blood vessels in her nose - she used to be prone to sudden, explosive nose bleeds - cauterised.

Whether the procedure to insert stents, plus her pace maker, or the cauterisation of blood vesssels, did the needful, I do not know and cannot say, but I do know that one or other procedure worked, to the extent that she - who had been a prodigious snorer - never dramatically disturbed anyone's sleep again during the night hours for as long as she lived.
 

thekev

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I used to think that "slaughter the snorer" (not kill, not murder, not merely end their existence painfully) was an appropriate response - but, perhaps, not.

Mother used to snore - lift the roof snoring, such as you saw in cartoons as a child, you could hear it from the front door, sneaking surreptitiously home.

However, - and this may be of interest - the snoring stopped - for good - once she had a cardiac procedure done (stents and a pace-maker inserted) almost thirteen years before she died.

That's also not uncommon, but it has at least been an area of research determining whether apnea is a causal factor there, since interrupted breathing puts a lot of strain on the heart in the first place. I kind of suspect that it'll trend toward more conservative treatments applied earlier, if they can prove a long term cardiac benefit, although I haven't looked into whether there are active cohorts in this area (again, not a medical professional, I just read way too much, and the topic range shifts every couple years).
 
U

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My wife has sleep apnea, she uses a cpap. I snore when I lay on my back and sometime on my side, my wife’s I DoD not stop breathing and have to catch my breath. I have not yet a sleep study, but are there any kmown remedies that actually work, short of a cpap machine?

I looked at this online, “Sleep Connection Wrist Device”, then I went to Amazon and looked at reviews shreding this thing. Instead of half off at $60 it was for sale at $17 at Amazon. Sounds like it is unreliable and in trouble.



And this. None of these worked:
No way around that sleep study. It's not the snoring that is the issue. It's that the obstruction in your airway underoxygenates your body, causes poor sleep, which increases your cortisol levels which causes increased body weight, increase your blood pressure and age your blood vessels quicker and increases risk for cardiac arrhythmias (mainly atrial fibrillation).

Don't want a CPAP machine? Lose weight. How to lose weight quicker? Use a CPAP. The dental devices mentioned here are only an alternative for a select group of patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

You can prescreen yourself using the STOP-BANG questionnaire:

CALL your primary care provider tomorrow. Wait lists are LONG for sleep studies.
 

Scepticalscribe

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No way around that sleep study. It's not the snoring that is the issue. It's that the obstruction in your airway underoxygenates your body, causes poor sleep, which increases your cortisol levels which causes increased body weight, increase your blood pressure and age your blood vessels quicker and increases risk for cardiac arrhythmias (mainly atrial fibrillation).

Don't want a CPAP machine? Lose weight. How to lose weight quicker? Use a CPAP. The dental devices mentioned here are only an alternative for a select group of patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

You can prescreen yourself using the STOP-BANG questionnaire:

CALL your primary care provider tomorrow. Wait lists are LONG for sleep studies.

Ah, atrial fibrillation......did someone mention atrial fibrillation?

Mother, bless her, suffered from that, at least, until she had the procedure whereby a pace-maker and several stents were inserted, whereupon she lived (more or less) happily ever after until the day she died. (Dementia notwithstanding).
 
U

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Ah, atrial fibrillation......did someone mention atrial fibrillation?

Mother, bless her, suffered from that, at least, until she had the procedure whereby a pace-maker and several stents were inserted, whereupon she lived (more or less) happily ever after until the day she died. (Dementia notwithstanding).
Afib is one of the leading causes of stroke by forming clots in the heart that bombard the brain. These can cause major strokes, or minor events that can lead to vascular dementia. It's all linked. Poor sleep increases risk for Alzheimers and other brain disorders because the brain's self-cleaning processes (glymphatic flow) work mainly in the state of sleep.
 
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Huntn

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No way around that sleep study. It's not the snoring that is the issue. It's that the obstruction in your airway underoxygenates your body, causes poor sleep, which increases your cortisol levels which causes increased body weight, increase your blood pressure and age your blood vessels quicker and increases risk for cardiac arrhythmias (mainly atrial fibrillation).

Don't want a CPAP machine? Lose weight. How to lose weight quicker? Use a CPAP. The dental devices mentioned here are only an alternative for a select group of patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

You can prescreen yourself using the STOP-BANG questionnaire:

CALL your primary care provider tomorrow. Wait lists are LONG for sleep studies.
I may have to get that sleep study. :(
 

Thomas Veil

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I vividly remember somebody telling me about surgery they had to treat apnea. I don't recall exactly what was cut (probably something at the back of the throat), but I do recall the effect.

He told me it was horrible and he regretted it. A certain amount of bleeding was involved, and he said that at one point he coughed in the shower and a huge clot of blood spattered on the floor. Gross.
 
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Huntn

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I vividly remember somebody telling me about surgery they had to treat apnea. I don't recall exactly what was cut (probably something at the back of the throat), but I do recall the effect.

He told me it was horrible and he regretted it. A certain amount of bleeding was involved, and he said that at one point he coughed in the shower and a huge clot of blood spattered on the floor. Gross.
Brings back memories of a tonsillectomy. :)
 
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