MBP: “High Power Mode”

Cmaier

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MacRumors is claiming there is a new “high power mode,” but only for the 16” Pro Max configurations,


Very confusing article. I assume what they are saying is there is a toggle you can enable, and once enabled the system will decide when to use the mode. The description of the mode seems to mean it just allows a longer time before throttling, by revving up the fans higher, and not that the system increases the system clock above nominal or anything like that.

Seems very un-Apple-like, though. I would expect Apple to just include the mode and not require a toggle. Not clear what the downside of using it is (other than, of course, battery life and fan noise). Of course, I wouldn’t expect it to work when on battery power anyway.

The source article doesn’t cite its sources (re: the 16” Max requirement), so who knows.
 

Renzatic

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The source article doesn’t cite its sources (re: the 16” Max requirement), so who knows.

I couldn't imagine it being something relegated to the larger Mac, but it would make more sense for it to be exclusive to the Max, since it'd be more likely to generate more heat, and thus have a need for a fuck-it-go-all-out-with-the-fans mode.
 

Pumbaa

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When I first saw “high power mode” I thought it was going to be something like allowing the system to consume more power when plugged in than the power adapter can supply by using the battery to cover the difference. Would make sense to require actively enabling it then because the battery could drain despite plugged in to power.

Source: My vivid imagination.
 

Cmaier

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When I first saw “high power mode” I thought it was going to be something like allowing the system to consume more power when plugged in than the power adapter can supply by using the battery to cover the difference. Would make sense to require actively enabling it then because the battery could drain despite plugged in to power.

Source: My vivid imagination.

That already exists, though. Try doing a handbrake re-encoding when plugging your 15” or 16” MBP into a 40W power adapter. Battery will run down. Heck, even happens with an 85W power adapter (depending on model year of machine).
 

Pumbaa

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That already exists, though. Try doing a handbrake re-encoding when plugging your 15” or 16” MBP into a 40W power adapter. Battery will run down. Heck, even happens with an 85W power adapter (depending on model year of machine).
My MBP knowledge is as small and outdated as my MBP, obviously. Thanks for the update! 😂
 

Cmaier

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My MBP knowledge is as small and outdated as my MBP, obviously. Thanks for the update! 😂

Only macs I’ve ever actually used in a real way have been MBPs (starting with a Leopard machine), MBs and MBAs. I have an iMac, but only my kid uses it from time-to-time (we inherited it). I also have a much older machine I can’t talk about, but it’s sitting in the garage and other than powering it up a couple of times I’ve never used It.
 

DT

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Oh yeah, I read about this, you need a 240v power supply, Apple sells one with adapters for N10-30 and N14-30, 30a outlets ...


"Hey honey, what are you doing in the laundry room?"

"Oh, just running my Mac in high power mode."
 
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