Moving from Canon 6D MkII to the Sony a7R III

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Eric

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I posted this over at MR but wanted to share here as well. I've pulled the trigger for the Sony α7R III, primarily because I can continue to use my Canon lenses with the MC-11 adapter, to me having to get rid of all my lenses and move was too much so this seems like a good solution.

I've been very happy with the Canon 6D MKII and don't mind the DSLR aspect of it, I wasn't compelled to move to mirrorless to keep up with the times as much as I am the increase in dynamic range and better low light photography that the Sony is known for. I now have listed it on CL and Fredmiranda to try and offset some of the costs invested into the Sony.

I know the Canon R5 and R6 are competitive but with everyone raving about the Sony and so far the results have been better than expected, Canon just can't compete with the dynamic range of Sony, at least in the DSLR arena.
 

Cmaier

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I switched from Canon to Sony years ago, and eventually got rid of all my canon glass. Sony has its quirks, but in the end I get more good shots with Sony than I did with Canon.
 

citypix

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If I ever got back into using dSLRs I'd probably go Sony. Have to admit I really like Canon's glass. Still holding onto that. And am holding onto my 6D just so that I have a body that works with my Canon lenses.
 
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Cmaier

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If I ever got back into using dSLRs I'd probably go Sony. Have to admit I really like Canon's glass. Still holding onto that. And am holding onto my 6D just so that I have a body that works with my Canon lenses.

There are now some very good sony lenses, as it turns out, particularly wide angle. The 135 GM is also very very good.

What I love is I also have autofocus adapters for Leica M, so I often use a summilux 35 or 50 when I want a certain look. (manual focus works pretty well, too, with peaking and zoom turned on).
 

citypix

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There are now some very good sony lenses, as it turns out, particularly wide angle. The 135 GM is also very very good.

What I love is I also have autofocus adapters for Leica M, so I often use a summilux 35 or 50 when I want a certain look. (manual focus works pretty well, too, with peaking and zoom turned on).

That's tempting. Maybe next year when things calm down a bit, including the pandemic - I make photos of people on the street, and SF feels like a ghost town relative to 2+ years ago.

My favorite dSLR lens, the one I used 95+% of the time with my 6D was a 35 f/1.4, a superb Canon lens, though kinda big/heavy. A 50 for me starts feeling like a telephoto, making it tougher to get decent environmental context. With a 35 you just have to watch out for perspective distortion shooting close (hands, noses, hats, etc).
 

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That's tempting. Maybe next year when things calm down a bit, including the pandemic - I make photos of people on the street, and SF feels like a ghost town relative to 2+ years ago.
I know the feeling. I used to shoot at events, mainly. Aaaand then the last two years happened. So my 6D (Mark I) has been collecting dust for the majority of that time.

If I ever retire the 6D for a newer camera I'd probably go Canon again, I've been quite happy with the ones I've bought. The only thing that could end up tipping the scales on another direction is a much better low-light performance on a different brand.
 
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Eric

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I switched from Canon to Sony years ago, and eventually got rid of all my canon glass. Sony has its quirks, but in the end I get more good shots with Sony than I did with Canon.
All future lenses will definitely be Sony. The 70-200 MKIII L 2.8, 16-35 L 4.0, 24-105 L 4.0 are all performing flawlessly through. All pretty expensive and replacing them would be a huge pain in the ass, the fact that I could adapt them is why I decided to get this camera.
 

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Back in November 2019 I made the big switch from Nikon to Sony, and at that time traded in all my Nikon bodies and lenses because I had already determined that the new Nikon mirrorless Z system was not going to work for me. It was disconcerting and disappointing, as I'd been a Nikon user for many, many years. The major issue for me was that in the beginning they offered few new native lenses for their mirrorless bodies and many of my F-mount lenses either would not work at all with the new FTZ adapter or some of them would work, but the lenses would become manual focus only rather than remaining autofocus. While I do use manual focus for shooting macro and closeups, I would not be happy shooting manual focus with some of the other Nikon lenses that I had at that time.

I was already familiar with Sony, having used the NEX-7 (APS-C), several of the RX100 series of compact enthusiasts' cameras, and the RX10 IV, a "bridge" camera. I had been thinking for a while that I wanted to go full-out full frame mirrorless, having seen the advantages of mirrorless, the EVF, silent shooting, etc., but it took me a while to make up my mind about what I wanted, and I also waited while Nikon introduced its Z series to see if that would be the way I'd be going, which given my long history as a "Nikon Girl" seemed logical. I was very disappointed in Nikon's offerings and realized that it was time to make a significant change. I really appreciated the quality of the cameras I'd been using and the quality of lenses (Zeiss on the RX10 and RX100). The three APS-C Sony lenses I had with the NEX-7 were excellent as well. I knew that Sony had an abundance of choices, and various camera bodies and lenses ready to go, right off the shelf.... I had just made my mind up to go with the A7R III when Sony announced the A7R IV -- so I waited a bit longer. Finally the day came when I went to one of the local camera shops and traded in all my Nikon gear and came home with a brand-new Sony A7R IV plus three lenses: two macro lenses (90mm and 50mm) and the incredible 135mm f/1.8 GM. A month later I added the. 200-600mm since I live on a small lake and can often shoot water birds right from my deck. Since then I have been more than enjoying and appreciating my Sony gear and have added lenses as the need or desire arose. I've also bought a couple of Voigtlander E-mount manual focus macro lenses as well -- they have a special quality all their own.

It didn't take long at all to fall in love with the A7R IV and that first winter of 2020 was so much fun as the 90mm macro lens all but lived on the camera body most of the time. In the spring of that year I bought the 100-400mm GM as a lens to use while walking around the lake and the neighborhood, as I had found that the 200-600mm is just a bit too heavy and awkward for me to handle comfortably while out-and-about; it's definitely much happier on the tripod with a gimbal head. The 90mm macro and the 100-400mm GM are my two top favorite and most-used lenses.

For a while I pretty much seemed to shoot from one perspective or another -- either macro and closeup or telephoto at a distance..... Eventually, I was ready to add wide-angle to my lenses and am still exploring what all I can do with that, but it doesn't come as naturally to me as shooting macro or telephoto. In late August I bought the remarkable Sony A1, and am loving it even more than the A7R IV. Fantastic camera!

So that's my recent and current photography history.....
 

Cmaier

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Back in November 2019 I made the big switch from Nikon to Sony, and at that time traded in all my Nikon bodies and lenses because I had already determined that the new Nikon mirrorless Z system was not going to work for me. It was disconcerting and disappointing, as I'd been a Nikon user for many, many years. The major issue for me was that in the beginning they offered few new native lenses for their mirrorless bodies and many of my F-mount lenses either would not work at all with the new FTZ adapter or some of them would work, but the lenses would become manual focus only rather than remaining autofocus. While I do use manual focus for shooting macro and closeups, I would not be happy shooting manual focus with some of the other Nikon lenses that I had at that time.

I was already familiar with Sony, having used the NEX-7 (APS-C), several of the RX100 series of compact enthusiasts' cameras, and the RX10 IV, a "bridge" camera. I had been thinking for a while that I wanted to go full-out full frame mirrorless, having seen the advantages of mirrorless, the EVF, silent shooting, etc., but it took me a while to make up my mind about what I wanted, and I also waited while Nikon introduced its Z series to see if that would be the way I'd be going, which given my long history as a "Nikon Girl" seemed logical. I was very disappointed in Nikon's offerings and realized that it was time to make a significant change. I really appreciated the quality of the cameras I'd been using and the quality of lenses (Zeiss on the RX10 and RX100). The three APS-C Sony lenses I had with the NEX-7 were excellent as well. I knew that Sony had an abundance of choices, and various camera bodies and lenses ready to go, right off the shelf.... I had just made my mind up to go with the A7R III when Sony announced the A7R IV -- so I waited a bit longer. Finally the day came when I went to one of the local camera shops and traded in all my Nikon gear and came home with a brand-new Sony A7R IV plus three lenses: two macro lenses (90mm and 50mm) and the incredible 135mm f/1.8 GM. A month later I added the. 200-600mm since I live on a small lake and can often shoot water birds right from my deck. Since then I have been more than enjoying and appreciating my Sony gear and have added lenses as the need or desire arose. I've also bought a couple of Voigtlander E-mount manual focus macro lenses as well -- they have a special quality all their own.

It didn't take long at all to fall in love with the A7R IV and that first winter of 2020 was so much fun as the 90mm macro lens all but lived on the camera body most of the time. In the spring of that year I bought the 100-400mm GM as a lens to use while walking around the lake and the neighborhood, as I had found that the 200-600mm is just a bit too heavy and awkward for me to handle comfortably while out-and-about; it's definitely much happier on the tripod with a gimbal head. The 90mm macro and the 100-400mm GM are my two top favorite and most-used lenses.

For a while I pretty much seemed to shoot from one perspective or another -- either macro and closeup or telephoto at a distance..... Eventually, I was ready to add wide-angle to my lenses and am still exploring what all I can do with that, but it doesn't come as naturally to me as shooting macro or telephoto. In late August I bought the remarkable Sony A1, and am loving it even more than the A7R IV. Fantastic camera!

So that's my recent and current photography history.....

I also had a nex-7, and still use an rx100 as a pocket cam. From canon’s, switched to the original A7r, then A7s/A7rii combo, and now the A1. As you note, A1 is amazing. I can take 200 photos of my daughter, 99% with focus nailed, and she thinks I’m still composing the shot. :)

And the huge optical viewfinder made a huge difference for me. So pleasant to use.
 
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Eric

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Back in November 2019 I made the big switch from Nikon to Sony, and at that time traded in all my Nikon bodies and lenses because I had already determined that the new Nikon mirrorless Z system was not going to work for me. It was disconcerting and disappointing, as I'd been a Nikon user for many, many years. The major issue for me was that in the beginning they offered few new native lenses for their mirrorless bodies and many of my F-mount lenses either would not work at all with the new FTZ adapter or some of them would work, but the lenses would become manual focus only rather than remaining autofocus. While I do use manual focus for shooting macro and closeups, I would not be happy shooting manual focus with some of the other Nikon lenses that I had at that time.

I was already familiar with Sony, having used the NEX-7 (APS-C), several of the RX100 series of compact enthusiasts' cameras, and the RX10 IV, a "bridge" camera. I had been thinking for a while that I wanted to go full-out full frame mirrorless, having seen the advantages of mirrorless, the EVF, silent shooting, etc., but it took me a while to make up my mind about what I wanted, and I also waited while Nikon introduced its Z series to see if that would be the way I'd be going, which given my long history as a "Nikon Girl" seemed logical. I was very disappointed in Nikon's offerings and realized that it was time to make a significant change. I really appreciated the quality of the cameras I'd been using and the quality of lenses (Zeiss on the RX10 and RX100). The three APS-C Sony lenses I had with the NEX-7 were excellent as well. I knew that Sony had an abundance of choices, and various camera bodies and lenses ready to go, right off the shelf.... I had just made my mind up to go with the A7R III when Sony announced the A7R IV -- so I waited a bit longer. Finally the day came when I went to one of the local camera shops and traded in all my Nikon gear and came home with a brand-new Sony A7R IV plus three lenses: two macro lenses (90mm and 50mm) and the incredible 135mm f/1.8 GM. A month later I added the. 200-600mm since I live on a small lake and can often shoot water birds right from my deck. Since then I have been more than enjoying and appreciating my Sony gear and have added lenses as the need or desire arose. I've also bought a couple of Voigtlander E-mount manual focus macro lenses as well -- they have a special quality all their own.

It didn't take long at all to fall in love with the A7R IV and that first winter of 2020 was so much fun as the 90mm macro lens all but lived on the camera body most of the time. In the spring of that year I bought the 100-400mm GM as a lens to use while walking around the lake and the neighborhood, as I had found that the 200-600mm is just a bit too heavy and awkward for me to handle comfortably while out-and-about; it's definitely much happier on the tripod with a gimbal head. The 90mm macro and the 100-400mm GM are my two top favorite and most-used lenses.

For a while I pretty much seemed to shoot from one perspective or another -- either macro and closeup or telephoto at a distance..... Eventually, I was ready to add wide-angle to my lenses and am still exploring what all I can do with that, but it doesn't come as naturally to me as shooting macro or telephoto. In late August I bought the remarkable Sony A1, and am loving it even more than the A7R IV. Fantastic camera!

So that's my recent and current photography history.....
I'm envious of the A7R IV for sure, it's just a little outside of my budget, 61 MP gives you a TON of flexibility and detail though, but over 42 is still a pretty significant jump from my 24 MP Canon. I didn't realize that was your first experienced with the Nikon lenses and can assure you that would be a deal breaker for me if I didn't have all the features (including auto focus) that it had on my Canon. Wow, that must have been an adjustment.
 

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I also have an RX100, though I haven't used it in 5-6 years.

It's a nice camera for street shooting. I attached an O-ring to the lug on mine; for my middle finger, allowing me to keep a good grip on it and release the shutter with my index finger.

RX100 cam pic.jpg
 

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Eric, yes, I was glad that I had waited until the Nikon Z series actually came out and was in users' hands as well as reviewers' hands, and it became very apparent to me that the original promises Nikon made in its PR about how customers could use all their F-mount lenses with the FTZ adapter and the Z body were not exactly true. Some older lenses were not compatible with the FTZ adapter at all and other lenses, as I mentioned, would have been usable only as manual focus lenses even though they actually were autofocus. I'll happily manually focus a macro lens where I'm up close and personal with the subject and can see what I'm doing, but using it on a longer lens just wasn't going to cut the mustard. When I looked at the list of native lenses that were being offered with the initial launch, I saw no macro lenses at all, and when I looked at their "roadmap" projection and saw still no macro lenses that pretty much was the end of Nikon for me. I was ready to go mirrorless and Nikon had missed the boat as far as I was concerned. I turned my attention to Sony.... I'm glad I did! Only NOW, two years later, are my Nikon friends finally able to buy a couple of macro lenses. In the meantime I've been loving and enjoying my Sony ones all that time.....

One reason I knew that I wanted the A7R III over the A7III, which is where I'd started out in my thinking process, was indeed the potential for more detail and croppability. I have found that particularly with wildlife that I do need to crop fairly frequently. A duck will be swimming along doing something really cool and just as I hit the shutter button another duck gets himself halfway into the frame. In PP, easy enough to simply crop out that extra unwanted duck and no harm done to the overall impact of the image. When the A7R IV was announced, I gawked at the amazing 61 MP and said, "WOW!" Believe me, it has made a difference a few times when I otherwise would have had to discard an image. Being able to crop fairly extensively is pretty nice. The A1 gives me the best of both worlds: loads of croppability with its 51 MP and yet fast speed and good ISO as well -- basically a combo of the best features of the A9 and A7R IV. I absolutely love my "saucy" A1!

Cmaier, I also loved that NEX-7 -- a dandy little camera and some years ago my introduction to mirrorless. It was tempting to keep it, actually. However, at the time I was making the big switch I decided to trade it in, too, as by that time it was rather long in the tooth and I had the feeling I'd be leaving it in a bag somewhere while I happily played with the A7R IV anyway, and also I traded in the three lenses I had with it, since they were all APS-C. Since I was buying a full-frame body anyway, I wanted to put all my resources into going with a good new kit right from the start, including full frame lenses. The 135mm GM was actually an impulse purchase. I had already decided on the two macro lenses right from the get-go and had also thought that the 24-105mm would be an excellent and useful third lens with which to start out. So I'm standing in the store waiting as the store staff sorted through my Nikon gear. The box with the A7R IV was on the counter, and so were the two boxes with the macro lenses and the box with the 24-105. I kept looking up at the store shelves, where I could see a 135mm GM and it was singing a siren song to me.... After we'd gotten finished with the final agreement on the trade-in amount and the sales person was about to start ringing up things, all of a sudden I blurted, "actually.....I'd like the 135mm GM. I'll get the 24-105 another time." She smiled and quickly swapped out boxes and I gently touched the box containing the 135mm GM as the siren song turned into a quiet, happy purrrr.....

I still haven't bought the 24-105mm! Other lenses have taken priority for one reason or another as I've been finding a need and specific purpose for each. LOL! At the rate I'm going I probably never will have one and really I don't need it with the nice range of focal lengths and such that I've been gradually developing over the past two years.

Citypix, I love the RX!00! I've been using them for several years and Its primary role is as my travel camera, my stick-in-my-purse camera. The quality of the images is outstanding. That's a great idea to put an O-ring on the lug; right now I've got a couple of Peak Design thingies connected to the extra connectors that Sony provides in the box since the PD thread or whatever you call it is too thick to fit through the lugs in my RX100 VII. That way I can either use a PD wrist strap or the "leash" strap with the camera, depending upon the situation. Since I haven't traveled much over the past couple of years and only recently have started using PD straps, a trip I'm planning in December will be the first real tryout of that system.

Earlier this afternoon I spent a happy hour or so outside shooting around the lake -- the temperature was just right, the air was nice and clear, the light was great -- one of those wonderful photography days we get every now and then. Only problem is that thanks to too-heavy a finger on the shutter release, I once again managed to zip through two 80 GB CF Express Type A cards! Silent shutter and that fast 20 fps are great but it's just too easy to fire off too many shots in sequence. With wildlife, though, it does pay off in the end. Fortunately I had a third 80 GB CFExpress Type A card, along with a spare battery, in the little pouch that I carry in my pocket for just such an occasion. After I thought about things for a short time, I got online and paid a visit to B&H. I have now ordered an additional card, this time a 160GB.....

So, basically I went from being first an all-Nikon household to a mixed household with Nikon and Sony to now an all-Sony household. I'm more than happy with Sony and the quality of their gear.
 
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Pumbaa

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This could be me too, sooner rather than later. I’ve been using Nikon for quite some time until my trusty old D610 got thirsty during a safari and had plenty of water without my consent. I haven’t visited a repair shop yet due to the pandemic, maybe there still is some life left in the old fellow.

I am going to upgrade, that much is certain, I’m just not sure exactly when (or to what). The Nikon Z series and the FTZ adapter sounded good at first, but the more I read the more prepared to make a radical switch I get. I had just started looking into Sony’s mirrorless offerings when this thread showed up, perfect timing. Thanks everyone for your contributions to the thread so far!
 
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Eric

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This could be me too, sooner rather than later. I’ve been using Nikon for quite some time until my trusty old D610 got thirsty during a safari and had plenty of water without my consent. I haven’t visited a repair shop yet due to the pandemic, maybe there still is some life left in the old fellow.

I am going to upgrade, that much is certain, I’m just not sure exactly when (or to what). The Nikon Z series and the FTZ adapter sounded good at first, but the more I read the more prepared to make a radical switch I get. I had just started looking into Sony’s mirrorless offerings when this thread showed up, perfect timing. Thanks everyone for your contributions to the thread so far!
Yeah, both Nikon and Canon came late to the mirrorless game and it has cost them in terms of losing out to the boom. Not to mention the dynamic range of the Sony can't be matched for all intents and purposes, that's not to say their new mirrorless offerings aren't decent but they're behind the 8 ball.

Sony was also smart to make sure their cameras will work with with lenses from other manufacturers, from what I've read it's one of the main reasons Canon and Nikon users felt like that could make the change. Anyway, can't wait to see your stuff!
 

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This could be me too, sooner rather than later. I’ve been using Nikon for quite some time until my trusty old D610 got thirsty during a safari and had plenty of water without my consent. I haven’t visited a repair shop yet due to the pandemic, maybe there still is some life left in the old fellow.

I am going to upgrade, that much is certain, I’m just not sure exactly when (or to what). The Nikon Z series and the FTZ adapter sounded good at first, but the more I read the more prepared to make a radical switch I get. I had just started looking into Sony’s mirrorless offerings when this thread showed up, perfect timing. Thanks everyone for your contributions to the thread so far!

The only knock on Sony, from my perspective, is ergonomics. It’s been getting better each year, though.
 

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I have been a long-time member of NikonCafe and for something like 30 years always had been a loyal Nikon user, so of course when they announced that they were (finally) getting into the mirrorless arena, I, like many of my Nikon friends, was excited and interested. Unfortunately Nikon (a) was resting on its perceived laurels for much too long and (b) was way, way too late to the parade when mirrorless was becoming a really significant entity in the photography industry. Nikon apparently thought that, OK, they'd jump in with mirrorless and offer their own adapter and make promises which weren't realistic and that would be that. Not so. When reality bit at least for me, it really crunched down hard and I was actually stunned but not surprised at how disappointed I was and how, even as I knew that Nikon wasn't going to be meeting my needs in the mirrorless realm, there was a lot of sadness that I felt. Actually, also, too, right along with the disappointment and the sadness there was and remains some anger as well, and that has continued to linger, even two years on..... And, yes, time to let go of that, right...... I know I'm not alone, too, as many other former Nikon users are now using Sony or Canon instead. Nikon missed the boat big-time on this whole mirrorless thing and even though they're now scrambling to catch up, IMHO it's really too late. They've lost me and lost a bunch of other people who once considered themselves Nikon users for life.....

My Sony gear has actually far surpassed my expectations and goes beyond the results that I used to get with my Nikon gear and that in itself says a lot.

I know that I am far from alone in this, that there have been many former Nikon users who have made the switch to either Sony or Canon for their movement forward with mirrorless camera bodies and lenses. Sony has been in the lead in the mirrorless game for quite some time, and that's not surprising, especially as they do actually have good gear to offer right now, plus continuing to come out with outstanding new lenses and bodies. People interested in Sony do not need to just look at something listed in another manufacturer's "road map" for the future and wonder when they'd be able to buy and use that body, that lens.....

And, yes, in the beginning Sony, even as they were working on developing their own lenses also had arrangements with Zeiss and others to get some additional lenses up and running and into the hands of customers so that there WOULD be something in the way of lenses for people to use with their new FF bodies right from the get-go, and also had no problem with third-party manufacturers also using the Sony E-mount and reverse-engineering as needed in order to also provide more lenses as well.

It really wasn't until the Sony A7 III that things really took off for them, though, and that camera body has been a huge seller for Sony. In the meantime, Canon and Nikon were still piddling around with DSLRs and not seeing that they needed to be moving into the mirrorless world sooner rather than later. Canon has fared better than Nikon, though, as at least they actually did get themselves in gear (play on words intended here!) once they saw the handwriting on the wall......and with Canon's huge customer base, that was a very wise move. The flexibility with ease in using adapters also has made a difference, too, for Canon users.
 
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Cmaier

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I have been a long-time member of NikonCafe and for something like 30 years always had been a loyal Nikon user, so of course when they announced that they were (finally) getting into the mirrorless arena, I, like many of my Nikon friends, was excited and interested. Unfortunately Nikon (a) was resting on its perceived laurels for much too long and (b) was way, way too late to the parade when mirrorless was becoming a really significant entity in the photography industry. Nikon apparently thought that, OK, they'd jump in with mirrorless and offer their own adapter and make promises which weren't realistic and that would be that. Not so. When reality bit at least for me, it really crunched down hard and I was actually stunned but not surprised at how disappointed I was and how, even as I knew that Nikon wasn't going to be meeting my needs in the mirrorless realm, there was a lot of sadness that I felt. Actually, also, too, right along with the disappointment and the sadness there was and remains some anger as well, and that has continued to linger, even two years on..... And, yes, time to let go of that, right...... I know I'm not alone, too, as many other former Nikon users are now using Sony or Canon instead. Nikon missed the boat big-time on this whole mirrorless thing and even though they're now scrambling to catch up, IMHO it's really too late. They've lost me and lost a bunch of other people who once considered themselves Nikon users for life.....

My Sony gear has actually far surpassed my expectations and goes beyond the results that I used to get with my Nikon gear and that in itself says a lot.

I know that I am far from alone in this, that there have been many former Nikon users who have made the switch to either Sony or Canon for their movement forward with mirrorless camera bodies and lenses. Sony has been in the lead in the mirrorless game for quite some time, and that's not surprising, especially as they do actually have good gear to offer right now, plus continuing to come out with outstanding new lenses and bodies. People interested in Sony do not need to just look at something listed in another manufacturer's "road map" for the future and wonder when they'd be able to buy and use that body, that lens.....

And, yes, in the beginning Sony, even as they were working on developing their own lenses also had arrangements with Zeiss and others to get some additional lenses up and running and into the hands of customers so that there WOULD be something in the way of lenses for people to use with their new FF bodies right from the get-go, and also had no problem with third-party manufacturers also using the Sony E-mount and reverse-engineering as needed in order to also provide more lenses as well.

It really wasn't until the Sony A7 III that things really took off for them, though, and that camera body has been a huge seller for Sony. In the meantime, Canon and Nikon were still piddling around with DSLRs and not seeing that they needed to be moving into the mirrorless world sooner rather than later. Canon has fared better than Nikon, though, as at least they actually did get themselves in gear (play on words intended here!) once they saw the handwriting on the wall......and with Canon's huge customer base, that was a very wise move. The flexibility with ease in using adapters also has made a difference, too, for Canon users.

Plus, unless I’m mistaken, Sony makes the Nikon sensors? How long will that be viable for Nikon - Sony has to benefit from being able to control the sensor roadmap.
 

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Yes, Sony has been making the sensors for Nikon for quite a while now -- at least for the DSLRs. I don't know if they are still doing it with the new mirrorless Z series camera bodies or not, which is likely, but, yeah, Sony has had the ability right along to control the way a given sensor manufactured for another camera brand will act and just how good it really is. I wouldn't be surprised if of course Sony saved the best for use only in their sensors for their own camera bodies, which would make sense, wouldn't it?

From what I've seen, the "roadmap" thingy seems to be more pertinent and specific to listing the future appearance of eventual lenses rather than camera bodies, but I really have not been paying that much attention so that could be wrong.
 

ericwn

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Question for you Sony A7 users: can the camera save DNGs directly? That would enable some easy manipulation options straight from an iPad for example, without having to use any Adobe stuff like Lightroom etc.

I’ve been shooting Fuji cameras for a decade and like their JPEG output a lot. It helps me to get results without having to post process a ton of raws all the time.

When I was still sing my Nikons and Aperture on the Mac I also enjoyed the NIK effects but I don’t really want to sit in front of a Mac in my free time, the few hours of downtime I rather have my iPad and sit on the couch.
 
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