No direct charges for the killing of Breonna Taylor

ericgtr12

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With the exception of a charge of a "wanton endangerment" which is not a charge of murder or manslaughter.
"Wantonly" can be seen as the person's understanding of the risk at hand ("is aware of and consciously") and behaving negligently ("disregards a substantial and unjustifiable risk"), according to the law office.

Daniel Cameron, a known Trump supporter delivered the announcement and took questions from reports. He appeared callous and without Sympathy for Breonna and her family.

cameron.jpg


Understandably, this is an unacceptable outcome that the people will not stand for. The streets are already starting to fill up with protesters and the police have been staffing up for it ahead of today's announcement.
 

Huntn

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Police murder a Black citizen and no legal justice, AS USUAL. :mad:

Is there really confusion about the origins of the defund the police movement? A very interesting discussion about Grand Juries. They are pawns of the System, they are fed the case prosecutors want to make, and there should be no surprise they lean with what the system wants. An argument was made on MSNBC that the grand jury system should be done away with, or at a minimum the secrecy surrounding GJ proceedings should be removed. I’d really like to see the ethnic makeup of a typical grand jury.
 

ericgtr12

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Police murder a Black citizen and no legal justice, AS USUAL. :mad:

Is there really confusion about the origins of the defund the police movement? A very interesting discussion about Grand Juries. They are pawns of the System, they are fed the case prosecutors want to make, and there should be no surprise they lean with what the system wants. An argument was made on MSNBC that the grand jury system should be done away with, or at a minimum the secrecy surrounding GJ proceedings should be removed. I’d really like to see the ethnic makeup of a typical grand jury.
They must be different than the juries who award money in wrongful death suits, which seems like an indictment in its own right.

Cops are already beating up protesters, they're on high alert and they're high strung. I don't see this ending well.
 

Alli

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I don’t understand. I don’t understand how the other two cops weren’t charged. I don’t understand how the one who was charged basically wasn’t. I don’t understand how the city could pay millions of dollars for something they take no responsibility for. Remind me again why they paid?
 

SuperMatt

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Kentucky votes for Mitch McConnell every 6 years. Even with his abysmal record, it looks like he’s comfortably ahead for 2020 as well.

This doesn’t surprise me in the slightest.
 

ronntaylor

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If you’ve ever been on a grand jury, it’s very slanted towards the prosecutor. If the prosecutor in this case wanted these cops to be tried, they would be. The prosecutor is protecting the cops.

The adage that a prosecutor could indict a ham sandwich is true. So when there are no charges in a case that calls for it, it's because the presenting prosecutor wasn't trying very hard. This McConnell lapdog did whatever he was told to do. :mad:
 

Renzatic

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There are reports that two officers have been shot in the ensuing fallout from this verdict. This means we're likely to see things escalate considerably from here.

Just another day in America Made Great Again.
 

ericgtr12

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There are reports that two officers have been shot in the ensuing fallout from this verdict. This means we're likely to see things escalate considerably from here.

Just another day in America Made Great Again.
There's no way I can condone the shooting of anyone innocent, whether it's those officers or Breonna Taylor. However, I do see the outrage from those marching, change will never happen if the people don't take a stand.
 

ronntaylor

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There are reports that two officers have been shot in the ensuing fallout from this verdict. This means we're likely to see things escalate considerably from here.

Just another day in America Made Great Again.

When I heard about the lack of indictments for the Breonna Taylor murder, the first thing that came to mind was the Dallas police shootings. Didn't think it'd come to this so quickly. TBH, I'm surprised this hasn't happened more often given police actions lately.
 

Renzatic

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There's no way I can condone the shooting of anyone innocent, whether it's those officers or Breonna Taylor. However, I do see the outrage from those marching, change will never happen if the people don't take a stand.

I don't even know what to say about this. I can't condone it, but I know it can't be suppressed, nor can it be ignored. BLM is now officially the largest, most concentrated protest in the history of the United States, dwarfing even the Vietnam protests in the 60's.

To all the people who have been fantasizing about the prospects of a civil war since the Bundy's took their stand in Oregon, well, here you go. This is what you all wanted. This is what we all get.
 

Huntn

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I don’t understand. I don’t understand how the other two cops weren’t charged. I don’t understand how the one who was charged basically wasn’t. I don’t understand how the city could pay millions of dollars for something they take no responsibility for. Remind me again why they paid?
My impression is that the city is treating this as their mistake, but the cops are blameless in an unfortunate situation. I’m not any kind of an expert on the details of this case, but the more I read, the more I am inclined to blame the local drug task force and the decision to issue this warrant.
  • Was Taylor the target of a warrant? Apparantly her address, or car seen at a “suspect” location was.
  • Was this a no-knock warrant?
  • If so, why did the police announce themselves (claimed)?
  • Why did only one other person hear this announcement? (stated)
  • Have no knock warrants been suspended since this shooting?
  • So if someone yells “police“ outside your door, you are supposed to believe it’s the police?
  • What If you are in the back of your living space and can’t make out the announcement?
  • My understanding is that a Kentucky has Castle Laws?
  • What do they expect will happen when a likely armed home owner has their front door burst open?
  • So if there is a shot from an apartment police are entering, the protocol becomes blindly shoot into the apartment?
These policies are viewed by a large number of citizens as designed to kill, kill especially minorIties. Read this:


The bottom line, based on suspicion and hunches, such as a car stops at a location where drugs maybe sold, authorities are issuing warrants where citizens end up being killed in a hail of bullets?

What a mess, in this case the police are just the agents for local authorities who were sent to deal with “criminals”, accept there was no evidence they were criminals and Taylor was killed as her apartment was invaded. What genius thought this up?

It is grounds to question police policy in general, how much evidence, beyond suspicion is required to put citizen’s lives in danger? You might not hold the police officers themselves responsible, who are in a bad situation. Someone shoots at them, and they will shoot back. But based on their actions, you can ask, once a shot is fired is everyone in the target home, now expendable? They can be held accountable for that.

And based on my impression, the people in the drug enforcement task force who put these events into play should also be held accountable.
 
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Renzatic

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I've been seeing this pop up on Facebook a lot today. It's supposedly a leak explaining the REAL reason why the police raided Taylor's home, which has something to do with a body found in a car.

I've glanced at it, but haven't started looking anything up contained therein yet. The whole thing is fairly suspect, and doesn't look like an official police report (they usually don't imbed screenshots in their documentation), but...hell, see for yourself.

 

JayMysteri0

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I've been seeing this pop up on Facebook a lot today. It's supposedly a leak explaining the REAL reason why the police raided Taylor's home, which has something to do with a body found in a car.

I've glanced at it, but haven't started looking anything up contained therein yet. The whole thing is fairly suspect, and doesn't look like an official police report (they usually don't imbed screenshots in their documentation), but...hell, see for yourself.

I've said A reason was more to do with this...

Which is what is referred to in the USA today post by @Huntn
What happened after Breonna Taylor's shooting?
After March 13, detectives watched pedestrian and vehicle traffic through the pole camera at Elliott Avenue, which they said indicated narcotics trafficking continued.

"Although the traffic isn't as heavy as it was before, it is apparent that these individuals are still selling narcotics from this location," Jaynes wrote.

Over the next few weeks, detectives conducted at least three traffic stops on vehicles leaving the Elliott Avenue home – once for failing to wear seat belts and another for an improper turn – and found drugs in the vehicles.

One of those traffic stops prompted Goodlett to write an April 8 note to the city’s public nuisance and Metro 311 email accounts, documenting the property’s latest infraction – it's “strike 3."

City documents show that Goodlett and the Place-Based Initiative officers had worked closely with city Codes and Regulations Department personnel for months to keep tabs on the Elliott Avenue house.

On Jan. 22, the property owner, Law Mar Inc. and Gerald Happle, received its first notice of criminal activity "constituting a public nuisance."

On March 17, following the March 13 warrants, the property was formally deemed a public nuisance.

Happle called the next day to ask about donating the house.

The city gave Happle an order to vacate the home on April 13. By then, Happle already had given his renters notice to leave the home and signed an application to donate the house to the city.

On April 22, detectives executed another "no knock" search warrant on 2424 Elliott Ave. – the third in five months.

Police found crack cocaine, suspected ecstasy or MDMA, marijuana and other drug paraphernalia, Jaynes wrote.

The same day, with the aid of the city's Codes and Regulations Department, police cleared and boarded up 2424 Elliott Ave.

On June 5 – what would have been Taylor's 27th birthday – Happle signed over the deed on the house. The city paid $1.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Here’s how it goes down. Police are given expanded power, tactics, and equipment. Why and by who, I have no idea. There are obvious possible negative outcomes to this expansion but when that worst case scenario actually happens the police are protected because it all falls under use of those expansions. If the police were given a decommissioned tank by the military and managed to blowup a city block with it they’d be protected because they just used a tank for what its capable of doing. Sorry, not sorry. If you or I used a tank to do the same thing it would be a completely different legal outcome for us.
 

JayMysteri0

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And... it begins to get worse... This will be an interesting fight for the AG. Does he actively fight to prevent the grand jury transcript being released, while so many have questions of what he really revealed?

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — An unidentified grand juror in the Breonna Taylor case is asking the courts to release the grand jury transcript and records and for fellow jurors to be free to speak about the case, according to a new court filing.

"The full story and absolute truth of how this matter was handled from beginning to end is now an issue of great public interest and has become a large part of the discussion of public trust throughout the country," Kevin Glogower, the attorney for the juror, wrote in the court filing.

Filed just after 4 p.m. Monday and less just five days since the grand jury's indictment, the grand juror is not named in the document and seeks to remain anonymous.

They ask for the proceedings to be disclosed so "the truth may prevail."
 

SuperMatt

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And... it begins to get worse... This will be an interesting fight for the AG. Does he actively fight to prevent the grand jury transcript being released, while so many have questions of what he really revealed?

Sounds like charges for killing her weren’t even presented to the jury at all.
 

ericgtr12

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And... it begins to get worse... This will be an interesting fight for the AG. Does he actively fight to prevent the grand jury transcript being released, while so many have questions of what he really revealed?
That AG is a worthless Trump worshiper, probably looking to get in his good graces. What a total sellout.
 

JayMysteri0

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I guess we will find out
In a surprising development, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has announced that on Wednesday he would release the recording from the grand jury proceedings that decided Breonna Taylor’s case.

The statement arrived after a member of the grand jury filed a motion calling for the disclosure of the jury’s records, accusing the attorney general of using jurors as a “shield to deflect accountability and responsibility.” The juror argued that the public deserved to know the “full story and absolute truth of how this matter was handled.”

In the days following the jury’s verdict—which did not indict the officers who fatally shot Taylor in her apartment—Cameron has failed to answer many of the outstanding questions in Taylor’s case.

The most glaring of these is whether the grand jury even got the opportunity to vote on potential homicide charges for the officers who killed Taylor, or if Cameron had already decided that those charges weren’t appropriate, given his belief that the officers were “justified” in firing those fatal shots, since they had allegedly been fired at first. (This particular detail—that Taylor’s boyfriend shot one of the offers that night—has been called into question by an official ballistics report.)

Taylor’s family had been calling for Cameron to release the grand jury records even before the juror’s motion, troubled by this same question. But up until now, Cameron has refused to make those records public because of the ongoing criminal case and FBI investigation into Taylor’s death.

Why did we get here? Seems that NO video, has since turned into a lot of video

Hankison pleaded not guilty.

Brett Hankison, the only officer to be charged with a crime stemming from the incident, pleaded not guilty in court on Monday. Hankison was charged with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment over bullets that pierced a neighboring apartment occupied by a man, a pregnant woman, and a child. According to the state, Hankison fired his gun 10 times through “a sliding glass door and through a bedroom window.” Hankison was fired in June for violating department policy but is appealing that decision. The attorney general’s office has said that Hankison’s actions showed “extreme indifference to human life” but that they did not know if any of his bullets hit Taylor.

Critics have demanded to know why Hankison was charged with endangering Taylor’s neighbors but not Taylor herself, given the alleged recklessness of his shooting. If Hankison is convicted on all three charges, he faces between three and 15 years in prison.

New evidence from the state ballistics report adds some uncertainty to the police version of events. According to a screengrab of the report published by Vice News on Friday, the initial ballistics report included in the police department’s file did not prove that the bullet was Walker’s. Instead it concluded that “due to limited markings of comparative value, [the bullet] was neither identified nor eliminated as having been fired from” Walker’s gun. The FBI also conducted a ballistics report, but the finding of that report is not public. In his press conference last Wednesday, Cameron stated that Walker had shot Mattingly as a matter of indisputable fact. He did not mention the inconclusive report.

The bullet hit Mattingly in the thigh, puncturing his femoral artery and putting him in danger of bleeding out. He was rushed to the hospital and underwent surgery. The medics who aided Mattingly did not deliver aid to Taylor, who died within minutes of being shot. Vice reported Friday that photos from Mattingly’s wound “depict a bruising pattern and coloration consistent with having been shot from close proximity”—something that could indicate he was not shot by Walker standing at the other end of the hallway. However, Vice acknowledged that Mattingly’s wallet, which was pierced by the bullet, might have also caused bruising.

It’s possible we will never know exactly what happened. If Mattingly were a victim of friendly fire, the thought would be upsetting, but it wouldn’t change much. Walker has never contested that he fired a warning shot at the person he thought was an intruder (he has said he fired it toward the ground). If in the confusion that followed the warning shot, Mattingly was hit by a bullet fired by one of his fellow officers, the officers would still be able to justify their actions as self-defense.

Video shows officers violating policies meant to safeguard the integrity of the investigation.

On Saturday, Vice posted a clip from body camera footage in which Hankison can be seen entering Taylor’s apartment as investigators were working the scene. According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, Hankison’s presence there would be a clear violation of department protocol for the aftermath of a police shooting.

In the video, Hankison can be seen standing near a shell casing and saying, “That’s theirs?” An officer responds, “That’s ours, it looks like.” He then tells Hankison to “back out” until the department’s public integrity unit can arrive. But Hankison does not leave, and he instead asks the officers on the scene more questions.

In Louisville, according to the Courier-Journal, when officers are involved in an incident in which police fire their guns, they are meant to be separated from one another afterward and paired up with an independent “escort officer.” The escort is meant to remain with their paired officer through the entire initial investigation, monitoring the officer’s interactions and ensuring the officer makes it to the public integrity unit office. But according to Vice, the footage from the body cameras showed that none of the officers involved in the raid followed that protocol. Instead, Detective Michael Campbell, one of the officers involved in the raid, helped interview neighbors while Detective Myles Cosgrove remained at the scene. According to the FBI, Cosgrove was the one who fired the fatal shot. He fired 16 times in total, according to the state.

In his press conference, Cameron said that there was “no video or body camera footage of the officers’ attempted execution of a search warrant.” It appears true that Mattingly, Hankison, and Cosgrove were not wearing body cameras. But other officers who were at the scene after the shooting had activated body cameras. These videos appear to bolster the claim that the police had misled the public about the existence of video evidence.

Over the weekend, clips of apparent body camera footage, allegedly obtained from an attorney for the Taylor family, circulated on social media. The videos were posted by a man named Kendrick Wilson, another client of the same attorney. Wilson said the lawyer obtained the body camera footage from the family’s $12 million settlement with the city. Under the terms of the settlement, the family cannot release evidence provided by the city. Wilson is not an independent party in the matter: the Taylor family lawyer also said that he hired Wilson as an investigator to work on the Taylor case, and the lawyer’s work representing Wilson has been for a pending harassment lawsuit against Hankison.

But if the videos Wilson posted can be trusted, they seem to show some details from the scene not already shared with the public. According to the Courier-Journal:
In one video clip Wilson posted, an officer he claims is not Hankison says his rounds went through Taylor’s window. In another, an officer can be heard stating that there was a “Black female” shot inside, along with the shooter—indicating that police might have known that Taylor had been seriously wounded before Walker exited the apartment and was arrested.

And, ...unsurprisingly...
Videos also appear to show police intimidating Walker.

According to Vice, body camera footage shows that as Walker walked slowly backwards during his arrest, following the officers’ orders, a narcotics dog jumped at him. An officer shouted at Walker, “Walk straight back or I will send this dog on you.” When Walker asks what he had done, Hankison replied: “You’re going to prison, that’s what’s going on. For the rest of your fucking life.”

The confusion over the case has led to calls from the Taylor family for the transcripts from the grand jury decision to be made public. It’s still unclear if the members of the grand jury were given the option to decide if the officers should be charged with any form of homicide, or if the state had decided the charges—and matter of self-defense—for them
 
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