Nothing new, but they make a legitimate point.

LIVEFRMNYC

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Not just Twitter, but most social media platforms seem to pick n choose when they sternly enforce this rule. It's obvious they barely bothered enforcing anything when these women's name were attached.

 

Edd70

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Part of the reason Twitter, Facebook, and others like them can seemingly do as they like is that the users are not customers. If they were, I think rules would be much more evenly applied.

That said, I don’t understand their decisions as they’re currently applied. It can appear random.
 

ericgtr12

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Not just Twitter, but most social media platforms seem to pick n choose when they sternly enforce this rule. It's obvious they barely bothered enforcing anything when these women's name were attached.

I'm split on this, on one hand I don't like wishing death on anyone because I I disagree with them or their policies, personally I see it at as a rallying cry to get them voted out.

On the other, look at all the people who have died from this that could've been prevented, yet his supporters are all over Twitter defending it, isn't that the same thing? The question is how they'll enforce it going forward.
 

Scepticalscribe

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To me, it is a classic double standard, made much worse by the fact of the mostly (but not always) unconscious (but still very real) inbuilt sexism of much of the tech world, and the platforms they construct.

Twitter, and FB have been extraordinarily lax in enforcing online safety for women, and supremely tolerant of abusers and stalkers and those who spew death and rape threats, especially when the victims (or targets) are female.
 
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Alli

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Twitter, and FB have been extraordinarily lax in enforcing online safety for women, and supremely tolerant of abusers and stalkers and those who spew death and rape threats, especially when the victims are female.
This. This is the point. How many crazies called for harm to these four women with no repercussion at all. Yet one word against a man and boom. Remember my mother was put in Twitter jail for saying that Ratcliff was a rat and she wished he would take a walk off a cliff.
 

lizkat

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To me, it is a classic double standard, made much worse by the fact of the mostly (but not always) unconscious (but still very real) inbuilt sexism of much of the tech world, and the platforms they construct.

Twitter, and FB have been extraordinarily lax in enforcing online safety for women, and supremely tolerant of abusers and stalkers and those who spew death and rape threats, especially when the victims (or targets) are female.

Part of it is that they could but probably don't use enough AI to proactively look for stuff that should be reviewed, i.e. with some exceptions for high profile names, they may rely on user reports of guideline violations... but most of us may instead either have filters applied, block the author of some particularly obnoxious post/tweet or just scroll past with an eye-roll.

Bottom line, it would seem that it's perhaps ...unrealistic?... to expect users to exercise some kind of "civic responsibility" regarding abusive behavior of other users in the land of online pixels.

So the platforms need to make better use of software tools to bring egregiously abusive stuff to their own attention for a closer look, while at least occasionally running banners or whatever to remind users of their right to report (not just mute / block etc) content that violates guidelines and makes the platform unpleasant or dangerous to them or to other people.
 

Scepticalscribe

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I actually think that they - those (mostly men) who own, run, and design these tech platforms - don't think (or see, let alone, even notice), that this stuff levelled at, or targeted at, women is so corrosively wearing, degrading, and occasionally deadly dangerous, that it serves to make the online life of any woman who has a public presence, life, voice, or platform an utter misery at times.

This is because it is not really relevant to their lives, or worth bothering about, - they are not under threat, or the victims, or the target - because, at the end of the day, women's concerns don't matter, don't register, and aren't taken seriously, not until there is a financial or economic penalty for not doing so, or a legislative requirement to do so.
 
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LIVEFRMNYC

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Part of it is that they could but probably don't use enough AI to proactively look for stuff that should be reviewed, i.e. with some exceptions for high profile names, they may rely on user reports of guideline violations... but most of us may instead either have filters applied, block the author of some particularly obnoxious post/tweet or just scroll past with an eye-roll.

Bottom line, it would seem that it's perhaps ...unrealistic?... to expect users to exercise some kind of "civic responsibility" regarding abusive behavior of other users in the land of online pixels.

So the platforms need to make better use of software tools to bring egregiously abusive stuff to their own attention for a closer look, while at least occasionally running banners or whatever to remind users of their right to report (not just mute / block etc) content that violates guidelines and makes the platform unpleasant or dangerous to them or to other people.
I agree with your statement, but I believe these women (like many others) have reported it to twitter, and very little or nothing at all has been done.
 

SuperMatt

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Look no farther than the VC community for why privileged white men run everything in tech. Start-ups don’t need to make a profit. They need to schmooze rich white men, and funny enough... young white men born with a silver spoon in their mouth can get the investment money.

I knew a guy (recently deceased) who claimed he was a self-made man, worth at least a few hundred million. He was in the same kind of business as Mitt Romney - private equity firm. I wondered how he got the money to get started with it. I did some research and found that he didn’t have a lot of money growing up, but he went to Harvard and made friends there. He got the idea of buying a weak company and trying to profit from increasing its value and selling it. He found a small company and only cost about a million to do it (although this was many years ago when a million was a LOT of money) - and it turns out he had a friend whose dad was rich and loaned him a million bucks - no collateral. He only had to come up with something like $10K himself. He made a big chunk of profit on that and kept rolling from there. So, a lot of “self made“ rich white men are flat-out lying, even to themselves. Without his friend’s rich dad basically handing an unproven kid a million bucks with no way to know if he’d ever get the money back.... who knows if this guy ever would have been successful.

Crony capitalism is not just happening in Russia. They’re just more open about it.
 

JBaby

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This isn’t just a gender problem it’s racial too. Because while they hardly ever do anything when it comes to the abuse women are subjected to on social media in general. When they do act. It’s almost always for white women.
 

Scepticalscribe

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This isn’t just a gender problem it’s racial too. Because while they hardly ever do anything when it comes to the abuse women are subjected to on social media in general. When they do act. It’s almost always for white women.

I agree absolutely and completely with you.

The sustained, sadistic and vicious - absolutely vitriolic - abuse women of colour receive online is beyond horrific, and worse, it is widely shrugged off, or over-looked, and is a case where gender and ethnicity (or race) both seem to serve as giving permission to some to add to this appalling abuse.
 

JBaby

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I agree absolutely and completely with you.

The sustained, sadistic and vicious - absolutely vitriolic - abuse women of colour receive online is beyond horrific, and worse, it is widely shrugged off, or over-looked, and is a case where gender and ethnicity (or race) both seem to serve as giving permission to some to add to this appalling abuse.

And something else no thinks about, including myself, is that it’s ableist too. I know plenty of disabled women who get death threats on Twitter. They get called ugly. Told they should’ve been aborted and I don’t know of a single case that has been investigated and the perpetrator punished. I didn’t think about it earlier because I’m just used to it never being mentioned and when it is no one cares.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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And something else no thinks about, including myself, is that it’s ableist too. I know plenty of disabled women who get death threats on Twitter. They get called ugly. Told they should’ve been aborted and I don’t know of seen a single case that has been investigated and the perpetrator punished. I didn’t think about it earlier because I’m just used to it never being mentioned and when it is no one cares.

Agreed, disgusting.

And not something that had occurred to me, either, in this context, until you drew my attention to it.

I suspect that this may unconsciously derive from the real rage some (men) seem to feel at any woman who fails, or declines, or is unable - or unwilling - to conform to perceived - and strictly policed - standards for female "beauty", or attractiveness, and that they are to be castigated, condemned, denigrated, and openly despised, otherwise.

However, I do know that it is interesting to examine where and how such attitudes - and my mother used to argue that "all rights depend on attitudes" - are cultivated, domestically and in the wider public society, both for good and for ill.
 

lizkat

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Agreed, disgusting.

And not something that had occurred to me, either, in this context, until you drew my attention to it.

I suspect that this may unconsciously derive from the real rage some (men) seem to feel at any woman who fails, or declines, or is unable - or unwilling - to conform to perceived - and strictly policed - standards for female "beauty", or attractiveness, and that they are to be castigated, condemned, denigrated, and openly despised, otherwise.

However, I do know that it is interesting to examine where and how such attitudes - and my mother used to argue that "all rights depend on attitudes" - are cultivated, domestically and in the wider public society, both for good and for ill.

A male emphasis on a woman's perceived beauty --as a marker somehow of capability in a woman rising to power??-- may have to do at least in part with already increasing gender diversity in high level positions in the private sector as well as in government. The more closely an accomplished woman approaches real power, the stronger may still be the resistance to her breaking that ceiling.

It can all begin to look from the outside like that old explanation of how to think about infinity: Walk halfway across the room. Stop. Now walk half the remaining distance. Stop. Now walk half the remaining distance. Stop. Now walk half the...

Yeah. Never gonna get there if the rule is you only get to go "half the rest of the trip" at a pop.


Note: above piece is from 2016. I can't imagine things have got all that much better by any intention of the Trump administration... despite maybe some more lip gloss on existing small business programs, for instance.

But on the bright side: while Trump busy looking in the mirror, and his lackeys polishing his boots, all sorts of mischief he and his minions may not be paying attention to have been happening.

Some of that mischief is the positive spinoff of Democrats finally remembering that how you make progress for ordinary people is in rebuilding a political bench from the ground up. As seen before and at midterm elections of 2018, more women have been running for office, and crashing through glass ceilings in local and state politics. That's bound to have a salutatory effect on women's success in the private sector too as time rolls on. We'll see a different and more egalitarian, more outside-the-jobs-box way of looking at how government defines and supports "free market incentives" in the USA. Daycare, for instance... transportation options....
 

Huntn

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A male emphasis on a woman's perceived beauty --as a marker somehow of capability in a woman rising to power??-- may have to do at least in part with already increasing gender diversity in high level positions in the private sector as well as in government. The more closely an accomplished woman approaches real power, the stronger may still be the resistance to her breaking that ceiling.

It can all begin to look from the outside like that old explanation of how to think about infinity: Walk halfway across the room. Stop. Now walk half the remaining distance. Stop. Now walk half the remaining distance. Stop. Now walk half the...

Yeah. Never gonna get there if the rule is you only get to go "half the rest of the trip" at a pop.


Note: above piece is from 2016. I can't imagine things have got all that much better by any intention of the Trump administration... despite maybe some more lip gloss on existing small business programs, for instance.

But on the bright side: while Trump busy looking in the mirror, and his lackeys polishing his boots, all sorts of mischief he and his minions may not be paying attention to have been happening.

Some of that mischief is the positive spinoff of Democrats finally remembering that how you make progress for ordinary people is in rebuilding a political bench from the ground up. As seen before and at midterm elections of 2018, more women have been running for office, and crashing through glass ceilings in local and state politics. That's bound to have a salutatory effect on women's success in the private sector too as time rolls on. We'll see a different and more egalitarian, more outside-the-jobs-box way of looking at how government defines and supports "free market incentives" in the USA. Daycare, for instance... transportation options....
It’s been claimed men are more susceptible to physical appearance than women are as far as impacting judgement.
 

lizkat

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It’s been claimed men are more susceptible to physical appearance than women are as far as impacting judgement.

I did not know that, but it doesn't seem out of the question. In many cultures, women are brought up to accept if not actively seek a partner whose financial worth or perceived earning capability is the main attraction.
 

Huntn

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I did not know that, but it doesn't seem out of the question. In many cultures, women are brought up to accept if not actively seek a partner whose financial worth or perceived earning capability is the main attraction.
It might be the reason why Playboy flourished while Playgirl never took off. And when women were in the second class citizen role, when choosing a partner, security was often more important than pretty, but those are general observations which may not be that accurate and certainly have exceptions. I’m hoping their are not viewed as sexist on my part. :unsure:
 

Alli

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It might be the reason why Playboy flourished while Playgirl never took off.
No. Playgirl never took off because women’s bodies are more attractive. You don’t even find the equivalent available today for gay men.
 

JBaby

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No. Playgirl never took off because women’s bodies are more attractive. You don’t even find the equivalent available today for gay men.

Doesn’t that that more to do with the time period we live in? I can’t imagine Playboy being successful today if it started now. We have all porn available to us.
 

ericgtr12

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Doesn’t that that more to do with the time period we live in? I can’t imagine Playboy being successful today if it started now. We have all porn available to us.
It's a different time for sure, there is a lot to be said for leaving some things to the imagination as opposed to full fledged hardcore porn at your fingertips. Frankly, I'm glad to have grown up where that wasn't available.
 
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