Police Brutality

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Chew Toy McCoy

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Jeez! At first glance it looks like the deputy showed his true self, by who he was really concerned with. Calling the sheriff's dept and NOT an ambulance.


Deputy- "Hello! Send someone people are getting hostile here after I shot a Black guy."

Sheriff's Dept- "How's the person you shot?"

Deputy- "Who?"

To me it sounds like he thought shooting the guy made more sense then having to explain how he hit somebody with his truck. Invent the backstory after the fact. I’m sure he has a quick mental rolodex of common excuses used to shoot black people.

It goes without saying he probably wouldn’t have even entertained this option if the guy he hit was white. The likelihood of having to shoot a black person sounds much more feasible.
 

SuperMatt

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To me it sounds like he thought shooting the guy made more sense then having to explain how he hit somebody with his truck. Invent the backstory after the fact. I’m sure he has a quick mental rolodex of common excuses used to shoot black people.

It goes without saying he probably wouldn’t have even entertained this option if the guy he hit was white. The likelihood of having to shoot a black person sounds much more feasible.
Did he hit the person with his vehicle, then see that the person was still alive, and decided to shoot him so he couldn’t talk? Was it attempted vehicular murder, and it failed, so he had to shoot him? The explanation makes no sense.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Did he hit the person with his vehicle, then see that the person was still alive, and decided to shoot him so he couldn’t talk? Was it attempted vehicular murder, and it failed, so he had to shoot him? The explanation makes no sense.

Agreed. And I think black people just randomly acting all crazy in front of white guys in vehicles is probably at an all time low historically. Tucker Carlson might not even be able to explain this one away, although I'm sure he probably had it all figured out as soon as we heard it.
 

Yoused

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He had the same first and last name, but he did not have his DL on him. The police apparently could not be arsed to compare the 23-y/o black man to the simple description of the 49-y/o white man and let him go.

Not brutality, in the traditional sense, but holding a person in jail for six days, because, we are idiots, can have brutal effects on a person's life.
 

ronntaylor

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He had the same first and last name, but he did not have his DL on him. The police apparently could not be arsed to compare the 23-y/o black man to the simple description of the 49-y/o white man and let him go.

Not brutality, in the traditional sense, but holding a person in jail for six days, because, we are idiots, can have brutal effects on a person's life.
Saw this on my twin's FB page. I'm always afraid something like this will happen to me. My name is much more common than I thought. My doctor's office has several with the same name, including another with the same middle initial.

And once when I had a medical emergency and was in the back of an ambulance, the EMT entering in my info stated, "From Denver, Colorado?" I said no. He repeated my legal name with middle initial. Then asked for my birth date. Gave it to him and he said, no it shows 20 years earlier. He had to recheck before realizing that the other Ronald Taylor was a white male exactly 20 years my senior.

How all those people failed to do a simple match is beyond me. Hope he takes them for shit-ton of money. Won't make up for six days of jail time and I'm sure a great deal of anxiety. Wouldn't surprise me that his "record" gets him in trouble again.
 

SuperMatt

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Saw this on my twin's FB page. I'm always afraid something like this will happen to me. My name is much more common than I thought. My doctor's office has several with the same name, including another with the same middle initial.

And once when I had a medical emergency and was in the back of an ambulance, the EMT entering in my info stated, "From Denver, Colorado?" I said no. He repeated my legal name with middle initial. Then asked for my birth date. Gave it to him and he said, no it shows 20 years earlier. He had to recheck before realizing that the other Ronald Taylor was a white male exactly 20 years my senior.

How all those people failed to do a simple match is beyond me. Hope he takes them for shit-ton of money. Won't make up for six days of jail time and I'm sure a great deal of anxiety. Wouldn't surprise me that his "record" gets him in trouble again.
I have an extremely common name as well. I had problems with 2 different background checks because of it, but both times they eventually figured out it was a different person. Afterwards I saw the paperwork on one of them and they actually had pictures of the “trouble” person with my name and he looked absolutely nothing like me at all…
 

Yoused

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My name is somewhat uncommon, though, I was apparently the #1 first round draft pick a couple decades back (that the first block of search engine hits I get on me, even if I include my middle initial). My mother, however, when she divorced my dad, and he remarried to a woman with the same first name, decided that since she had her father's name for 20 years and her husband's name for 20 years, she would take her mother's maiden name, but with a goofy French spelling, so now her name is unique in the US, perhaps the world.
 

JayMysteri0

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How to inspire trust... 🤨

The Virginia Beach Police Department used forged documents with fake DNA evidence in interrogations in order to get confessions on at least five occasions, the state Attorney General Mark Herring said.

Herring's Office of Civil Rights concluded an investigation last April that found that the police department was forging documents pretending to be from the Virginia Department of Forensic Science. The department used these forged documents on at least five occasions between March 2016 and February 2020, according to the investigation.

"This was an extremely troubling and potentially unconstitutional tactic that abused the name of the Commonwealth to try to coerce confessions," Herring said in a statement on Wednesday.

"It also abused the good name and reputation of the Commonwealth's hard-working forensic scientists and professionals who work hard to provide accurate, solid evidence in support of our law enforcement agencies. While I appreciate that Virginia Beach Police put an end to this practice and cooperated with our investigation, this is clearly a tactic that should never have been used," he said.
The Virginia Beach Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but in a statement to The Washington Post, the department said that what happened, "though legal, was not in the spirit of what the community expects."
Really?
The investigation into the Virginia Beach Police Department began when a request was made to the forensic department to provide a copy of one of the forged documents, but DFS never created or knew about the document in the first place.

Investigators from Herring's office found that the police department was using the forged documents as "supposed evidence" to try to get confessions, cooperation and convictions. The police department would lie and say the suspect's DNA was connected with the crime and provide that in the document, which had forged letterhead and contact information, according to the investigation

Let this sink in, as if courts weren't already tilted against those who can't afford the best legal teams

On two occasions, the investigation found, the police department included a signature from a made-up employee at DFS. In one case, the forged document was presented in court as evidence.
 

AG_PhamD

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He had the same first and last name, but he did not have his DL on him. The police apparently could not be arsed to compare the 23-y/o black man to the simple description of the 49-y/o white man and let him go.

Not brutality, in the traditional sense, but holding a person in jail for six days, because, we are idiots, can have brutal effects on a person's life.

Crazy. You’d think they could verify his identity in something less than 6 days. I don’t understand how incompetent the police can be to not verify know physical characteristics (race, heights, weight, eye color, fingerprints, photos, DOB, SSN). Apparently the white guy didn’t have his DL which I suppose might complicate things for 30 seconds but had his SSN card.

He is suing the police. I suspect he will win.

He is lucky though- innocent people have been put on trial for heinous crimes just because of mistaken identity.

How to inspire trust... 🤨




Really?


Let this sink in, as if courts weren't already tilted against those who can't afford the best legal teams

It’s scary to think how often this might actually occur. I mean, even the Carter Page situation, removing the politics of situation and what he may or may not have done illegally, the FBI admittedly falsified information (4 times?) to procure warrant and the agent responsible has pleaded guilty (though I assume other agents must have known about this too).

If this can be done to one of the top advisors to the future President, imagine what they can do to you or me- or especially people without the means to afford an expensive law firm to defend themselves.

Both these situations are things that could evidently happen to anyone. Particularly in the second case of corruption/forgery, the consequences need to extremely severe. If law enforcement understood they would their spend decades in jail.

This in the UK but this detective forged a witness statement in a murder investigation. His punishment- 8 months in jail. Ridiculous.
 

SuperMatt

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Crazy. You’d think they could verify his identity in something less than 6 days. I don’t understand how incompetent the police can be to not verify know physical characteristics (race, heights, weight, eye color, fingerprints, photos, DOB, SSN). Apparently the white guy didn’t have his DL which I suppose might complicate things for 30 seconds but had his SSN card.

He is suing the police. I suspect he will win.

He is lucky though- innocent people have been put on trial for heinous crimes just because of mistaken identity.



It’s scary to think how often this might actually occur. I mean, even the Carter Page situation, removing the politics of situation and what he may or may not have done illegally, the FBI admittedly falsified information (4 times?) to procure warrant and the agent responsible has pleaded guilty (though I assume other agents must have known about this too).

If this can be done to one of the top advisors to the future President, imagine what they can do to you or me- or especially people without the means to afford an expensive law firm to defend themselves.

Both these situations are things that could evidently happen to anyone. Particularly in the second case of corruption/forgery, the consequences need to extremely severe. If law enforcement understood they would their spend decades in jail.

This in the UK but this detective forged a witness statement in a murder investigation. His punishment- 8 months in jail. Ridiculous.
Carter Page? Seriously? Yeah he sure is a victim… never charged with a crime, not a minute spent in jail… and riding the right-wing media train to fame and fortune. I wish the FBI would pick on me the way they picked on him.

I don’t think the point of the posts you replied to is sympathy for people mildly inconvenienced by an overestimation of their possible crimes as they traveled the world trying to make political connections.

It’s about mistaken identity in one case, assuming that the black person is a criminal… and in other cases, intentional malfeasance, leading to convictions and people going to prison.

The DoJ IG report found errors, but not intentional malfeasance in regards to Page… and his various lawsuits have all failed. He’s not a victim in any sense of the term. Even the Republican-controlled Senate found:

The Republican-controlled Committee released its final report on 2016 Russian election interference in August 2020, finding that despite problems with the FISA warrant requests used to surveil him, the FBI was justified in its counterintelligence concerns about Page.[96] The Committee found Page evasive and his "responses to basic questions were meandering, avoidant and involved several long diversions."[96] The Committee found that although Page's advisory role in the Trump campaign from March 2016 to September 2016 was insignificant, Russian operatives may have thought he was more important than he actually was.[96]

It is pretty offensive to me when somebody compares Carter Page to actual victims of police misconduct. This right-wing deluge of tears for wealthy white “victims” who never actually suffered any harm is appalling.

If only the DoJ would spend the amount of time they spent investigating the mistakes made concerning Carter Page on actual victims of false convictions, police brutality, and other actual injustice, the world would be a far better place. But discrediting the Mueller Report was all that mattered, and to do that, they needed to manufacture a “victim” of unfair treatment… and came up with diddly-squat.
 
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AG_PhamD

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Carter Page? Seriously? Yeah he sure is a victim… never charged with a crime, not a minute spent in jail… and riding the right-wing media train to fame and fortune. I wish the FBI would pick on me the way they picked on him.

I don’t think the point of the posts you replied to is sympathy for people mildly inconvenienced by an overestimation of their possible crimes as they traveled the world trying to make political connections.

It’s about mistaken identity in one case, assuming that the black person is a criminal… and in other cases, intentional malfeasance, leading to convictions and people going to prison.

The DoJ IG report found errors, but not intentional malfeasance in regards to Page… and his various lawsuits have all failed. He’s not a victim in any sense of the term. Even the Republican-controlled Senate found:



It is pretty offensive to me when somebody compares Carter Page to actual victims of police misconduct. This right-wing deluge of tears for wealthy white “victims” who never actually suffered any harm is appalling.

If only the DoJ would spend the amount of time they spent investigating the mistakes made concerning Carter Page on actual victims of false convictions, police brutality, and other actual injustice, the world would be a far better place. But discrediting the Mueller Report was all that mattered, and to do that, they needed to manufacture a “victim” of unfair treatment… and came up with diddly-squat.

No, the consequences are not the same as being wrongfully arrested or incarcerated…did I say that? I’m not sure why mentioning another case makes it some sort of competition of who was wronged more? Especially when there are obvious differences…

Idk maybe I think civil liberties being violated is a problem. But if you want to minimize or disregard entirely the issue of living in a country where government agencies are illegally taking out warrants by deceiving the court system in order to dissolve your constitutional rights, you’re more than welcome to advocate for that.

Perhaps the FBI’s illegal actions in this case were just a mere “inconvenience” but such “inconveniences” create very slippery slope into falsifying other evidence into arrests and convictions.

I’m not a fan of the Trump or the sleazy crowd of people he surrounded himself with. I’m also not saying there wasn’t a legitimate, legal justification to investigate Page in the first place. But I don’t think it’s right to selectively choose what rights should apply to American Citizen based off their political affiliation- or race, religion, etc. I think you would agree?

It’s not a matter of personal sympathy, it’s a matter of right and wrong and the integrity of the laws and law enforcement.

And the FBI agent did not make a “mistake”, he pleaded guilty to intentionally falsifying documents in order to extend surveillance.
 
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SuperMatt

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No, the consequences are not the same as being wrongfully arrested or incarcerated…did I say that? I’m not sure why mentioning another case makes it some sort of competition of who was wronged more? Especially when there are obvious differences…

Idk maybe I think civil liberties being violated is a problem. But if you want to minimize or disregard entirely the issue of living in a country where government agencies are illegally taking out warrants by deceiving the court system in order to dissolve your constitutional rights, you’re more than welcome to advocate for that.

Perhaps the FBI’s illegal actions in this case were just a mere “inconvenience” but such “inconveniences” create very slippery slope into falsifying other evidence into arrests and convictions.

I’m not a fan of the Trump or the sleazy crowd of people he surrounded himself with. I’m also not saying there wasn’t a legitimate, legal justification to investigate Page in the first place. But I don’t think it’s right to selectively choose what rights should apply to American Citizen based off their political affiliation- or race, religion, etc. I think you would agree?

It’s not a matter of personal sympathy, it’s a matter of right and wrong and the integrity of the laws and law enforcement.

And the FBI agent did not make a “mistake”, he pleaded guilty to intentionally falsifying documents in order to extend surveillance.
Yes, I do disregard entirely Carter Page’s supposed sob story. Your characterization of the entire situation is seemingly being viewed through the glasses of right-wing media.

I don’t agree with any of the above. There is no slippery slope. Page was not targeted because of his politics. Let’s get serious; what was the nefarious crime the FBI agent pled guilty to?

Clinesmith admitted to one charge of inserting the words "not a source" into an email in 2017 about Page's history with the CIA, when Page had been a contact.

Also:

Boasberg, who is also the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court's presiding judge, notably said he believes the warrant still may have been signed for surveillance of Page, who in 2017 was a former Trump foreign policy adviser who was under investigation because of his ties to Russians.
"Even if Mr. Clinesmith had been accurate about Dr. Page's relationship with the other government agency, the warrant may well have been signed and the surveillance authorized," Boasberg said, though he also noted other mistakes in the Page foreign intelligence surveillance applications.
Clinesmith obtained no real personal benefit from his actions and had no active intent to harm, the judge also noted.
"My view of the evidence is that Mr. Clinesmith likely believed that what he said about Dr. Page was true," Boasberg said.
"He was saving himself some work taking an inappropriate shortcut," but didn't intend to give wrong information about Page, the judge added.
Wow. Even if the agent hadn’t inserted 3 whole words into the email, the surveillance would most likely have been approved anyway based on other evidence against Page.

You want to discuss Carter Page? Let’s do so. But his surveillance, which led to the FBI and CIA being investigated by the Trump DoJ for years at a cost of millions of dollars, does NOT belong in a thread about people being treated unfairly. It’s a massive disrespect to the ill treatment suffered regularly by average people (especially people of color) at the hands of police.

Just like past statements when discussing black distrust of medical professionals… about white people being the subject of unethical medical experiments, there is a disturbing trend here that seeks to delegitimize the complaints of people of color with the idea of “well it happens to everybody.”

In fact, the example you provided here shows that when a rich, politically connected white guy is treated SLIGHTLY unfairly, the world stops, millions of dollars are spent, and an agent who inserted 3 words into an email is prosecuted and sentenced. The exact opposite of what happens when countless people of color are mistreated routinely by police.
 
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JayMysteri0

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Again, brutality of another sort. Intentional, long lasting, and done because they can as the police.


When he got to court Dec. 2, he saw scores of people just like him lining up to stand before Judge Jim Wooten, complaining of penny-ante “crimes” and harassment by officers. He saw so many people trying to park in the grassy field outside the municipal building that police had to direct traffic.

He figured there was no point.

“I saw the same attitude in every officer and every person,” he said. “That’s why I hesitated to fight it. They were doing the same thing to every person that was there. They own the town.”

Perez, it appears, was right.

Months of research and dozens of interviews by AL.com found that Brookside’s finances are rocket-fueled by tickets and aggressive policing. In a two-year period between 2018 and 2020 Brookside revenues from fines and forfeitures soared more than 640 percent and now make up half the city’s total income.

And the police chief has called for more.

The town of 1,253 just north of Birmingham reported just 55 serious crimes to the state in the entire eight year period between 2011 and 2018 – none of them homicide or rape. But in 2018 it began building a police empire, hiring more and more officers to blanket its six miles of roads and mile-and-a-half jurisdiction on Interstate 22.

By 2020 Brookside made more misdemeanor arrests than it has residents. It went from towing 50 vehicles in 2018 to 789 in 2020 – each carrying fines. That’s a 1,478% increase, with 1.7 tows for every household in town.

The growth has come with trouble to match. Brookside officers have been accused in lawsuits of fabricating charges, using racist language and “making up laws” to stack counts on passersby. Defendants must pay thousands in fines and fees – or pay for costly appeals to state court – and poorer residents or passersby fall into patterns of debt they cannot easily escape.

“Brookside is a poster child for policing for profit,” said Carla Crowder, the director of Alabama Appleseed Center for Law & Justice, a nonprofit devoted to justice and equity. “We are not safer because of it.”
 

SuperMatt

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Deadly misbehavior by police is not limited to America.


The Ynet report describes a late-night encounter that unfolded very much as the Palestinian witnesses described, except for the troops’ assertion that Assad was fine when they left.
The report said soldiers had set up two surprise checkpoints in Assad’s home village of Jiljilya, just north of Ramallah, stopping vehicles at random to find any weapons or Palestinians wanted for questioning.
The soldiers described stopping Assad, who his family said was returning from playing cards at a cousin’s house less than a mile from his home. He did not have his U.S. passport or any other ID with him.
The soldiers said Assad “looked at least 20 years younger” than his age and that he protested loudly that he was not a terrorist, according to the report. Concerned that his shouts would tip off others to the presence of the roadblock, the report said, at least two soldiers “seized him by force and led him to the abandoned house, and even covered his mouth.”

They handcuffed and blindfolded Assad, the report said, and placed him on a chair. The witnesses, however, said Assad was left lying on stone pavers.
At one point, Assad began to look a little “stoned” or confused, the soldiers told investigators, according to the report. The soldier in charge of guarding him referred to Assad as “the one falling asleep.”
The soldiers said they decided to leave after briefly interrogating the other Palestinian detainees, who turned out not to have weapons or outstanding warrants against them. The soldiers then cut the tie around one of Assad’s wrists, removed the blindfold and left him in a chair, according to the report.
But Abdulrahma and another detainee, Abdulaziz Hamouda, said Assad was lying on the ground when the Israeli team left. They went to his side and found him not breathing.
The late Mr. Assad was a 78-year-old Palestinian American. This story made the news because he is an American. I wonder how often this happens to Palestinians without making the news.
 
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