random sound bytes

Mark

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william tell overture finale ala partially filled bottles


cornell bell tower Jennie McGraw Rag


cornell bell tower Far Above Cayuga's Waters


sorry for the randomness...
 
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lizkat

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sorry for the randomness...

No apologies even accepted! I had thought the thread was just gonna be a collection of old System 7 sound clips... so this far exceeded my expectations.

Still... somewhere I've a great clip of Bush the father musing that "... It's clearer to me now...." probably right after the 1992 elections.
 

lizkat

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Only remotely related to sound bytes, but at least it's pretty random, and it cracked me up.

Financial Times Finds Secondary Use.jpg
 

lizkat

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File under "no it wasn't a deer hunter cleaning his elephant gun... "

That impressive noise that some of us heard on Wednesday this week was just a fairly large meteor that got way farther into our atmosphere than a lot of them do. Its sonic boom was loud enough to trip earthquake sensors and some of the debris may have shown up on radar over Central New York.


Thanks to one of the cloudiest climates in the country, unfortunately, most Central New Yorkers didn’t get to witness the meteor. But it was captured on video in Western New York and Toronto, and people from Virginia to Ontario heard the deafening boom that sounded to some like gunshots or a falling tree. As one of the 181 observers who filed reports with the meteor society put it: “Scared the bejesus outta me.”

Based on those reports, the society calculated that the meteor hit the atmosphere above Lake Ontario and disintegrated just south of Rochester. NASA’s estimated trajectory shows a different path, with the meteor striking above Syracuse at 12:08 p.m. and diving southwest toward the Finger Lakes for 3 seconds before flaming out. It was just 22 miles above the ground at that point, which is a long, long way for a meteor to penetrate the atmosphere.

This meteor was so bright that it was captured by a NASA satellite that monitors lightning. The bits of debris scattered after the meteor exploded could likely be seen on National Weather Service radar. And the sonic boom was detected in Ontario by a seismograph, the instrument that records earthquakes.

When the meteor finally got hot enough to explode, Cooke said, it released as much energy as 66 tons of dynamite.

“When it broke apart it produced a shock wave that produced the sonic boom that people heard,” he said.

The meteor was just under 3 feet across and weighed about 1,800 pounds, NASA estimated. That’s hefty as meteors go: The shooting stars seen in annual meteor showers are no bigger than small pebbles or golf balls.

Wednesday’s meteor crashed into the atmosphere at 56,000 mph.
 

SuperMatt

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File under "no it wasn't a deer hunter cleaning his elephant gun... "

That impressive noise that some of us heard on Wednesday this week was just a fairly large meteor that got way farther into our atmosphere than a lot of them do. Its sonic boom was loud enough to trip earthquake sensors and some of the debris may have shown up on radar over Central New York.

Thank you, atmosphere!
 
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