South Carolina will now force death row inmates to choose method of execution

Zoidberg

Power User
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Posts
221
Reaction score
500
The electric chair is probably the worst of all. I'm not an expert on the topic but it would take many minutes with concurrent agonizing pain to kill somebody with it. It's the most steam punk way to kill someone. Sophisticated from a 19th century perspective, yet manages to be incredibly barbarian. If you have doubts, there's a reason we don't electrocute lab animals to death when they get euthanized.

Firing squad? Clear shot in the head that makes the brain explode is immediate. Clear shot in the heart would take 10-15 seconds with some agonal tonic seizures, anything beyond this would take minutes and in pain.

These take us beyond the issue of state issued murder and walk us into state issued torture territories.
Or 100% Nitrogen. It works and it's painless. The fact is, there are alternatives that they choose not to use.
 

P_X

Elite Member
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Site Donor
Posts
2,809
Reaction score
5,123
Or 100% Nitrogen. It works and it's painless. The fact is, there are alternatives that they choose not to use.
I didn't want to get into alternative approaches, but anything that primarily intends to deprive you of O2, definitely qualifies as at least long and potentially (definitely) still horrible.
 

Zoidberg

Power User
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Posts
221
Reaction score
500
I didn't want to get into alternative approaches, but anything that primarily intends to deprive you of O2, definitely qualifies as at least long and potentially (definitely) still horrible.
Having been through that process myself (although obviously not quite to the end, so with a very different outcome) I can personally confirm that it's completely painless as long as the CO2 levels don't increase (if they do the agony is indeed abject).

Edit to add that yes, I'm sure they'd find ways to botch even this method.
 
Last edited:

P_X

Elite Member
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Site Donor
Posts
2,809
Reaction score
5,123
Having been through that process myself (although obviously not quite to the end, so with a very different outcome) I can personally confirm that it's completely painless as long as the CO2 levels don't increase (if they do the agony is indeed abject).
I suspect you're talking about this in the context of diving (your old nick was despondent diver AFAIR), where pressure is also a significant factor. It also takes about a good 10 minutes or longer per my estimates where you completely replace O2 with N2 to an extent that causes death.
 

P_X

Elite Member
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Site Donor
Posts
2,809
Reaction score
5,123
Having been through that process myself (although obviously not quite to the end, so with a very different outcome) I can personally confirm that it's completely painless as long as the CO2 levels don't increase (if they do the agony is indeed abject).

Edit to add that yes, I'm sure they'd find ways to botch even this method.
(BTW, I almost never refer to my oath, because basic ethics cover most situations. But I do consider it part of my hyppocratic oath never to use my training to come up with "more humane" ways to kill humans. Just to clarify that I am very highly biased here.)
 

Zoidberg

Power User
Vaccinated
PRSI Banned
Posts
221
Reaction score
500
(BTW, I almost never refer to my oath, because basic ethics cover most situations. But I do consider it part of my hyppocratic oath never to use my training to come up with "more humane" ways to kill humans. Just to clarify that I am very highly biased here.)
I understand, and yes, it was in a diving context, although at atmospheric pressure so partial pressures were normal. It was involuntary, but in a controlled environment. I had always read that there were no clues, but feeling it in person was eye-opening: ZERO warnings, I didn't feel dizzy or anything. One second I was laying down calmly, and the next thing I remember I had two people assisting me and I felt fine again. No idea what happened in between.
 

lizkat

Thread Starter
Elite Member
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
3,145
Reaction score
6,912
What if they refuse to choose? If the law requires the inmate to make a choice in order for the execution to happen, it seems really easy to refuse the choice.

The piece said two inmates did exacdtly that and have also already sued in state court, asserting the law violates their constitutional rights. I suppose it's entirely possible the legal challenges will head on up the chain.

Apparently the new law is vague about the state's power to go ahead and use either electrocution or a firing squad in the event (as now) lethal injection is not possible due to lack of the drugs AND the inmate declines to make a choice of the offered alternatives.

Piece also notes that of 50 bills that just landed on the South Carolina governor's desk, THIS ONE is the one he decided to take up and sign first. There ma not have been any fanfare about it, but making that Job One of his current signing duties seems plenty fanfare enough, and of course the media picked up on it. Maybe the legislature and governor didn't expect backlash or lawsuits to be immediate, but that is what is occurring. Only Republicans will be surprised? These guys operate with tunnel vision and seemingly without much consideration of other people's rights and expectations...
 

Stephen.R

Site Champ
PRSI Banned
Posts
406
Reaction score
587
Why isn’t this a choice?

qvTz6D8.gif

I would humbly ask the court to grant my wish for death by snu snu.

 
Top Bottom