TF Guy! You know what it means

Thomas Veil

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👆 I've about had it with that guy. FUCK Manchin the closet Republican. Same with Sinema.

About the only thing left to do with him is an intervention. You know, trap him with a roomful of Democrats and not let him leave until you verbally beat him into submission. Crazy as that sounds, what else can you do with this guy? He's living in a fantasy world every bit as obstinate and delusional as these "stop the steal" people.
 

lizkat

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It's summertime. I'm starting to struggle to keep giving a damn about the antics of these knuckleheads in state capitols and in DC too, so I'm becoming part of the problem, I guess.

But I'm starting to feel like some states had it right back in the old days when the legislators were mostly farmers and so they met for a few months in late spring when arguing over lawmaking didn't get in the way of either planting, harvesting or a break from all that over winter.
 

JayMysteri0

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👆 I've about had it with that guy. FUCK Manchin the closet Republican. Same with Sinema.

About the only thing left to do with him is an intervention. You know, trap him with a roomful of Democrats and not let him leave until you verbally beat him into submission. Crazy as that sounds, what else can you do with this guy? He's living in a fantasy world every bit as obstinate and delusional as these "stop the steal" people.

That's the issue Manchin ignores, the very problem he himself represents, how the wants of the few outweigh the needs of the many.

 

SuperMatt

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Manchin wrote:
I believe that partisan voting legislation will destroy the already weakening binds of our democracy
Why isn’t he speaking out against all the partisan voting legislation happening all over America today? He is only against it if it favors his party? Huh?
 

SuperMatt

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👆 I've about had it with that guy. FUCK Manchin the closet Republican. Same with Sinema.

About the only thing left to do with him is an intervention. You know, trap him with a roomful of Democrats and not let him leave until you verbally beat him into submission. Crazy as that sounds, what else can you do with this guy? He's living in a fantasy world every bit as obstinate and delusional as these "stop the steal" people.
Manchin gets a lot of things done for his constituents. Stop some of the federal money going to WV… he will change his tune.
 

Thomas Veil

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Like Angus King, I’m a little reluctant myself. Those who live by the sword, etc.

But the filibuster was never meant to be an permanent, virtually impenetrable blockade. Right now removing it is one of democracy’s last options, and Manchin is stuck thinking we don’t need to because somehow he’s going to bring back the Congressional comity of 1979.
 

JayMysteri0

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Like Angus King, I’m a little reluctant myself. Those who live by the sword, etc.

But the filibuster was never meant to be an permanent, virtually impenetrable blockade. Right now removing it is one of democracy’s last options, and Manchin is stuck thinking we don’t need to because somehow he’s going to bring back the Congressional comity of 1979.
Exactly.

Manchin already tried the 'Home Alone' shocked face & faux anger when McConnell played games with the 1/6 commission. He expects McConnell won't pull the same shit over & over again whenever given the chance? Either the man's an idiot or a disingenuous liar more worried about maintaining a status quo or political opportunity in the future if he needs it. As pointed out, if McConnell got his way, that opportunity would never happen as McConnell wouldn't hesitate to nuke the filibuster for his own good.

He's no idiot. Except in the regards to thinking anyone is buying his or Sinema's bullshit about concern for bipartisanship over all else.

Oh yeah, no one's forgotten about Sinema

 
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Thomas Veil

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Chew Toy McCoy

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Somebody, I believe another Congressman, called Manchin the Democrats Mitch McConnell. He's worse than Mitch. Mitch doesn't block the agenda of his own party.

This reminds me of a recent Rose McGowan interview I heard where she said both parties are a cult but the Democrats are worse because with Republicans you at least know who the enemies are.
 

JayMysteri0

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Well ain't this some shit!

TF Guy Abbott.

So, consider what the 1619 Project has wrought:


So question then...

What is going to be different in the 1836 Project that isn't already taught?

The whole point of the 1619 Project was to share information about African Americans that is intentionally NOT taught in schools, because of certain easily **** hurt section of America.

You're basically going to teach the same stuff already taught now, but with greater spin & emphasis on things that a certain part of Texans will be happy about?

You got to love how the side that brought us the term "virtue signaling", now pretty confuses "signaling" as the only type of governance they care for.

Who knew teaching was meant to cater?

:rolleyes:

Like an old Black joke: Always stealing shit from Black folk after they've done it.
 
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Chew Toy McCoy

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So at this point it sounds like he isn’t even supporting his constituents. He’s just supporting his pipe dream fan fiction of where he thinks the country should be politically.

Frankly I don’t care if he loses to a Republican. At least we’d know what we’re dealing with and they’d be aligned with the right party.
 
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Thomas Veil

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...So question then...

What is going to be different in the 1836 Project that isn't already taught?
The difference is going to be that they they're going to make it look like Article VIII, SEC. 1. 1845 TX Constitution was a great example of keeping government out of our personal freedoms. :mad:
 

JayMysteri0

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The difference is going to be that they they're going to make it look like Article VIII, SEC. 1. 1845 TX Constitution was a great example of keeping government out of our personal freedoms. :mad:
It's all about choice.

Provided it's not an unborn in a woman, before the woman realizes she's pregnant.

Whoooo!

Can't wait to see how they rewrite Juneteenth! Yes Abbott wants to work on that as well. Although I think it may gloss over a few things.

In 1863, the proclamation legally freed millions of enslaved people in the Confederacy, but it exempted those in the Union-loyal border states of Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, and Kentucky. These states held Confederate sympathies and could have seceded; Lincoln exempted them from the proclamation to prevent this. In April 1864, the Senate attempted to close this loophole by passing the 13th Amendment, prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude in all states, Union and Confederate. But the amendment wouldn’t be enacted by ratification until December 1865.

And though the Civil War ended in April 1865 when Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia, enslaved people in Texas didn’t learn about their freedom until June 19, 1865. On that day, almost two and a half years after Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union army arrived in Galveston and issued General Order No. 3 that secured the Union army’s authority over Texas. The order stated:

  1. There are a few theories about why it took slaves so long to learn they were free:
  • One popular story is that the messenger on his way to deliver the news was murdered, according to Juneteenth.com.
  • Others believe the news was deliberately delayed because the slaves were needed on the plantations.
  • And a third theory is that federal troops waited for slave owners to get in one last cotton harvest before heading to Texas to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation.
2. It was Major General Gordon Granger who was sent to tell the slaves they were free. He read General Order Number 3, which began: "The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired laborer."
3. Granger stayed in Texas through the summer and encouraged the former slaves to stay on as hired labor, according to the Texas State Historical Association.
4. But many of them didn’t wait around to see how things would go in Texas. Even with nowhere to go, some headed north to start fresh with their newfound freedom.
5. In the early years, some communities refused to allow Juneteenth celebrations on public property. Many families were forced to find rural areas for their get-togethers. Churches were another popular alternative since local governments had no control over them.
6. Some white landowners refused to allow their employees to attend the annual events. But the majority gave them the day off and some even contributed food and money, according to Juneteenth.com.


8. Due to racial segregation laws, Emancipation Park remained the only city park in Houston where African Americans were allowed until 1939 when Finnegan Park opened.
 

lizkat

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So at this point it sounds like he isn’t even supporting his constituents. He’s just supporting his pipe dream fan faction of where he thinks the country should be politically.

Frankly I don’t care if he loses to a Republican. At least we’d know what we’re dealing with and they’d be aligned with the right party.

Not sure we'd really know what we're dealing with. West Virginia is an interestingly complicated state.... even from its inception as a state that separated from the Confederacy to join the Union as a new state during the US Civil War. Virginia had joined the Confederacy in 1861 and West Virginia became a state aligned with the Union in 1863.

Not that that has kept West Virginia from beiing tagged by some as "the most northern southern state and the most southern northern state"ever since that time. Its politics, economy, general demographics, religious affiliation etc. are all over the map in a lot of ways even if they are largely white and largely self-described Christians.

A sizeable percentage of that state's Christian Protestants is not affiliated with any major denomination, and so their members don't even get counted when pollsters get down to their hairsplitting of the "religious right" in regions of the USA... yet W.VA is pegged as perhaps the 7th most religious state in the country, Around 18% of their Protestants belong to independent churches. Did they vote for Trump? Probably. What do they think of him, or of the antics of Jerry Falwell Jr.? We're not sure because pollsters are relying on asking the big denominations like Presbyterians and Methodists and Baptists.

So... pinning down their politics is like trying to figure out how many coal miners are still up for the union and how many figure the union's day is past and they long for some authoritarian figure -- yeah, like Trump, you betcha-- to just "bring the jobs back" despite the implication that if they really did came back, they'd be largely stripped over time of the hard-won benefits that the long fights to organize mining workers had gained. We don't know a lot about that breakout of the West Virginia electorate either. We know they want jobs. We're not sure what sort of qualifications they'd lay on "give us jobs" now in the wake of the pandemic and the stimulus programs and the shifting sands there as states start trying to rein in unemployment benefits.

In this reframing of "work" itself in the USA as a result of necessities during the pandemic, there is definitely recognition that finishing broadband deployment to underserved areas is essential and makes working from places with lower costs of living more feasible. And the days of citizens blithely allowing stuff like separation of land ownership from mineral rights is, well... yeah, over.

Now West Virginians want brownfield cleanups and they may well look askance at Trump-era deregulaton of coal waste tipping.... and they sure don't expect to pay for cleanups out of income taxes because that money is not there. Most of all they want a piece of Biden's rescue plan, invewstment in their communities, to make up for the fact that the coal magnates didn't exactly get all philanthropic with their profits over lo these many decades.


“Making a place a good place to live becomes much more important now,” said Adam Ozimek, the chief economist at the freelance platform Upwork. “That’s also a much healthier type of competition than who’s going to give the Bass Pro outlet the biggest tax cut.”

That idea reframes the major infrastructure investments Senator Manchin and President Biden have proposed. Broadband, above all, is an essential precondition to remote work. Well-maintained roads, new parks and other public amenities also enhance quality of life. And major investments in environmental cleanup — because the environment is central to West Virginia’s allure — become an economic development strategy, too.

Until now, many organizations in West Virginia lament that the state has focused too heavily on luring outside employers, rather than building up the state’s own assets.

“If we’re going to think big about this, do we want any job at any price?” said Karen Jacobson, who leads the housing authority in Randolph County. “From any employer who’s going to take the deal now and leave 10 years from now?”

Of course that was back in February... and so now one wonders if Manchin imagines he can punish the Democrats by ditching his bluedog ways on votes that lend power back to the Republican Party.... and if he can still expect largesse for his state --and to his credit-taking in a future election?-- to flow out from Washington DC. The Democrats are rather looking to capitalize on their 2020 White House and Senate wins and to expand their appeal to the electorate in 2022.

Manchin is going the other way... and he may not be thinking realistically of the West Virginia electorate's needs. Maybe it's going to be up to more pragmatic less hyperpartisan (and local) movers and shakers in West Virginia communities to remind people what's at stake for them in Biden's proposals.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Not sure we'd really know what we're dealing with. West Virginia is an interestingly complicated state.... even from its inception as a state that separated from the Confederacy to join the Union as a new state during the US Civil War. Virginia had joined the Confederacy in 1861 and West Virginia became a state aligned with the Union in 1863.

Not that that has kept West Virginia from beiing tagged by some as "the most northern southern state and the most southern northern state"ever since that time. Its politics, economy, general demographics, religious affiliation etc. are all over the map in a lot of ways even if they are largely white and largely self-described Christians.

A sizeable percentage of that state's Christian Protestants is not affiliated with any major denomination, and so their members don't even get counted when pollsters get down to their hairsplitting of the "religious right" in regions of the USA... yet W.VA is pegged as perhaps the 7th most religious state in the country, Around 18% of their Protestants belong to independent churches. Did they vote for Trump? Probably. What do they think of him, or of the antics of Jerry Falwell Jr.? We're not sure because pollsters are relying on asking the big denominations like Presbyterians and Methodists and Baptists.

So... pinning down their politics is like trying to figure out how many coal miners are still up for the union and how many figure the union's day is past and they long for some authoritarian figure -- yeah, like Trump, you betcha-- to just "bring the jobs back" despite the implication that if they really did came back, they'd be largely stripped over time of the hard-won benefits that the long fights to organize mining workers had gained. We don't know a lot about that breakout of the West Virginia electorate either. We know they want jobs. We're not sure what sort of qualifications they'd lay on "give us jobs" now in the wake of the pandemic and the stimulus programs and the shifting sands there as states start trying to rein in unemployment benefits.

In this reframing of "work" itself in the USA as a result of necessities during the pandemic, there is definitely recognition that finishing broadband deployment to underserved areas is essential and makes working from places with lower costs of living more feasible. And the days of citizens blithely allowing stuff like separation of land ownership from mineral rights is, well... yeah, over.

Now West Virginians want brownfield cleanups and they may well look askance at Trump-era deregulaton of coal waste tipping.... and they sure don't expect to pay for cleanups out of income taxes because that money is not there. Most of all they want a piece of Biden's rescue plan, invewstment in their communities, to make up for the fact that the coal magnates didn't exactly get all philanthropic with their profits over lo these many decades.




Of course that was back in February... and so now one wonders if Manchin imagines he can punish the Democrats by ditching his bluedog ways on votes that lend power back to the Republican Party.... and if he can still expect largesse for his state --and to his credit-taking in a future election?-- to flow out from Washington DC. The Democrats are rather looking to capitalize on their 2020 White House and Senate wins and to expand their appeal to the electorate in 2022.

Manchin is going the other way... and he may not be thinking realistically of the West Virginia electorate's needs. Maybe it's going to be up to more pragmatic less hyperpartisan (and local) movers and shakers in West Virginia communities to remind people what's at stake for them in Biden's proposals.

From everything I've read Manchin would get replaced by a Republican if he lost an election, but if he does and you're saying that will still make the representative unpredictable I say that's still better because you'd have to assume the rep is Trumpy and anything they do outside that predictability would be a positive for the left. With Manchin currently you can assume the worst for the left and that's exactly what you are going to get.

Saw a clip last night of McConnell saying point blank that the era of bipartisanship is over. That's probably been over for McConnell for at least the past decade, but even with him saying that directly now I'm sure Manchin is going to cling even more to his dream (or whatever evil motive he has) of bipartisanship because he's a self serving asshole who, like Trump, wants to abuse his position to the fullest and put himself above all other interests.
 
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