The George Floyd Trial

SuperMatt

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To me, the most heartening thing about the trial was multiple police officers testifying AGAINST Chauvin. Saying that such behavior is NOT acceptable, nor does it match police training in any way. We need other police forces to do the right thing as well. I can understand there are times to protect your fellow officer from false claims, but when they clearly broke the law and/or abused their position, you need to hold them accountable.
 

JayMysteri0

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Everyone has their appeal as of right. I expect Chauvin to take advantage of it, and the usual crowd to babble and scream about the charges being invalidated shortly thereafter.
Only Chauvin will be taking advantage of that behind bars 🙏, hoping it provides security for him, from the OTHER inmates.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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I heard it suggested that the more the police get successfully prosecuted for these incidents then the less these incidents will happen. That’s good but by extension it is saying cops are a little trigger happy because they know it will be hard to prosecute them. But regardless, if a little mental attitude adjustment will help to decrease these incidents then good. Still waiting for police reform to happen, and that doesn’t just mean tossing more or less money at them.
 

P_X

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I heard it suggested that the more the police get successfully prosecuted for these incidents then the less these incidents will happen. That’s good but by extension it is saying cops are a little trigger happy because they know it will be hard to prosecute them. But regardless, if a little mental attitude adjustment will help to decrease these incidents then good. Still waiting for police reform to happen, and that doesn’t just mean tossing more or less money at them.
What makes me sad really, is if it's legitimate to expect violence/resistance from a person based on his criminal record, it is also reasonable expect higher risk of excess use of force by a cop who has a track record of such.

Cops who are in it to hurt people accumulate complaints that again predict future risk of excess use of force. Which takes us back to, if Chauvin was removed from the streets, Floyd would not have been killed that day. Based on the cost of settlements, it is very likely to be more cost efficient to actually just remove the people who are at highest risk to get in trouble that gets settled. Like Lt. Nazario's case. If he gets 1M, how many years of service by 2 cops could be covered by that much money?! Plenty.
 

thekev

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He’s back now, harping on how the trial should have been moved (as if people outside of Minnesota never heard of George Floyd) and that statements from Maxine Waters (and now comments made by Joe Biden AFTER the trial for some unknown reason) somehow will invalidate the verdict. No imagination - just parroting the same baloney on every right-wing social media site and TV show.

Unless they influenced the jury in some way prior to deliberation, I'm unsure of the problem.

I think the fascinating thing we will see after this, is how others won't learn that there will always be video to record one's actions & words


Keep showing that @$$ republicans. Then scratch that head wondering why PoC won't support you in great numbers.

She said it will drive law enforcement to quit, but this is an incomplete picture. If it drives bad cops to quit at a disproportionate rate, this is a good thing. If they both identify with Chauvin and put in their resignation, that is a positive thing.

If he gets 1M, how many years of service by 2 cops could be covered by that much money?! Plenty.

Depends on overtime..
 

P_X

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Unless they influenced the jury in some way prior to deliberation, I'm unsure of the problem.



She said it will drive law enforcement to quit, but this is an incomplete picture. If it drives bad cops to quit at a disproportionate rate, this is a good thing. If they both identify with Chauvin and put in their resignation, that is a positive thing.



Depends on overtime..
Oh, I know:D Some cops got busted for making 200-300K in overtime in my city:D
 

DT

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He’s back now, harping on how the trial should have been moved (as if people outside of Minnesota never heard of George Floyd) and that statements from Maxine Waters (and now comments made by Joe Biden AFTER the trial for some unknown reason) somehow will invalidate the verdict. No imagination - just parroting the same baloney on every right-wing social media site and TV show.

Yeah, he crawled off to some right-wing shit-show sites, cut and pasted a bunch of nonsense into a text document, and now he's back, fully armed and loaded, hahahaha ....
 

P_X

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Yeah, he crawled off to some right-wing shit-show sites, cut and pasted a bunch of nonsense into a text document, and now he's back, fully armed and loaded, hahahaha ....
I seriously think that's what he does, because the moment his argument is taken apart he disappears and restarts the cycle with some new pseudorandom shit he picks up from Breitbart.
 

SuperMatt

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Yeah, he crawled off to some right-wing shit-show sites, cut and pasted a bunch of nonsense into a text document, and now he's back, fully armed and loaded, hahahaha ....
Truer words were never spoken. That’s why there was no immediate response to the verdict. He had to read the right-wing talking points and regurgitate. No original thought going on there whatsoever.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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What makes me sad really, is if it's legitimate to expect violence/resistance from a person based on his criminal record, it is also reasonable expect higher risk of excess use of force by a cop who has a track record of such.

Cops who are in it to hurt people accumulate complaints that again predict future risk of excess use of force. Which takes us back to, if Chauvin was removed from the streets, Floyd would not have been killed that day. Based on the cost of settlements, it is very likely to be more cost efficient to actually just remove the people who are at highest risk to get in trouble that gets settled. Like Lt. Nazario's case. If he gets 1M, how many years of service by 2 cops could be covered by that much money?! Plenty.

I tend to think people who are hyper supportive of the police are probably conservative and of the fiscal variety. How they aren’t going ballistic over the bottomless taxpayer slush fund used to pay for millions and millions of dollars in won civil suits against cops blows my mind.

I’d like to see some data on exactly how much money is spent on that compared to the cost of whatever they typically think is a waste of taxpayer money.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Oh, I know:D Some cops got busted for making 200-300K in overtime in my city:D

Part of my police reform would be pay cops more but heavily restrict overtime. Nobody should be around that much potential stress and negativity on more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours per week.

I would even cut into their normal hours by mandating regular wellness checkins and possibly group support on the clock and not just only when they shot somebody. Also regular descalation training and practice on the clock. So 40 hours a week wouldn’t just be on the streets or filling out paperwork.
 

JagRunner

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He’s back now, harping on how the trial should have been moved (as if people outside of Minnesota never heard of George Floyd) and that statements from Maxine Waters (and now comments made by Joe Biden AFTER the trial for some unknown reason) somehow will invalidate the verdict. No imagination - just parroting the same baloney on every right-wing social media site and TV show.

Sounds about right - he went to get his talking points from Fox News and then came back.
 

P_X

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Part of my police reform would be pay cops more but heavily restrict overtime. Nobody should be around that much potential stress and negativity on more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours per week.

I would even cut into their normal hours by mandating regular wellness checkins and possibly group support on the clock and not just only when they shot somebody. Also regular descalation training and practice on the clock. So 40 hours a week wouldn’t just be on the streets or filling out paperwork.

1. Monetary reward to those meeting work benchmarks without substantiated complaints. => Boom, the money saved from decreasing settlements can go to these cops
2. Establish an independent oversight system to assess complaints.
3. Decouple DAs from police oversight - there's a clear conflict of interest
4. Curtail overtime for excessive force
5. Remove from the streets repeat excessive force users
6. Establish a collective departmental bonus system for reduction of excessive use of force complaints

If you have any doubts this would be better use of money look at these:

NYC has a ~220M budget per year for just Police settlements. Thats around 6K/cop. Insane, if you ask me.
 

Thomas Veil

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I've been wondering what may happen to Chauvin once in prison. The future does not look pretty or safe.
Oh, they love cops in prison. ;) Especially when the cop in question is guilty in the most infamous racist murder in recent memory.

And Chauvin isn't a big guy, either. I may make light of how the prison population will receive him, but seriously, I do wonder about his safety.

I tend to think people who are hyper supportive of the police...
You reminded me of something that they've been doing in Ohio for the last four years or so. You're supposed to deck out your house in blue light to show you support the cops.

This always has me conflicted. In my own relatively small city, as far as I can tell, the cops are fine. But on the whole, campaigns like this at a time like this seem remarkably tone deaf.

Part of my police reform would be pay cops more but heavily restrict overtime. Nobody should be around that much potential stress and negativity on more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours per week.

I would even cut into their normal hours by mandating regular wellness checkins and possibly group support on the clock and not just only when they shot somebody. Also regular descalation training and practice on the clock. So 40 hours a week wouldn’t just be on the streets or filling out paperwork.
Those are not bad ideas. I can only add my own: hire more black cops.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Oh, they love cops in prison. ;) Especially when the cop in question is guilty in the most infamous racist murder in recent memory.

And Chauvin isn't a big guy, either. I may make light of how the prison population will receive him, but seriously, I do wonder about his safety.


You reminded me of something that they've been doing in Ohio for the last four years or so. You're supposed to deck out your house in blue light to show you support the cops.

This always has me conflicted. In my own relatively small city, as far as I can tell, the cops are fine. But on the whole, campaigns like this at a time like this seem remarkably tone deaf.


Those are not bad ideas. I can only add my own: hire more black cops.

I don't know if the Trump winning era brought this on, but it seems now that when a certain group has a grievance the knee-jerk response from those sympathetic to the target of that grievance is to fire back even louder with "I/they aren't personally aren't part of that problem!". It's a really bizarre display of self-importance trying to suck the oxygen out of the room, but it's also the result of people instantly jumping to tribalism in both the accusation and defense. I commend the prosecution for reminding the jury this case wasn't about the entire police department. It was about one cop. unfortunately I feel if the prosecution didn't give the jury that reminder then their decision making might have weighed more heavily towards the police department, police culture, and possible repercussions well beyond this specific case.

I think when people hear reform they think of the punitive variety if for no other reason than we are a vengeful and spiteful society, but for my reform ideas about the only thing that is punitive is if you are too much of a tough guy then you probably won't be a cop much longer, too tough guy for regular ongoing therapy and retraining on methods to assure everybody involved in a confrontation is seen as human.

I also think we need a lot more "that's understandable". If you are going to spend a lot of your time around a certain group of people behaving badly then it's understandable how you might gain some negative preconceptions about that group of people, and "understandable" doesn't mean its the correct view or you agree with it. It means you can see how they got that view through their experience. You can't deal with that by going "You can't think or say that, you monster! Bottle it up!". You deal with it by talking about it and using methods to counter that negative bias. And to be honest, there are many people who have negative biases who have nowhere near the personal experiences of cops. I'd argue a good percentage of people in this country who have extreme negative feelings about Muslims haven't actually met any beyond just seeing them in public doing normal things we all do. Their entire solid opinion is based on negative media coverage of specific events.
 

SuperMatt

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I don't know if the Trump winning era brought this on, but it seems now that when a certain group has a grievance the knee-jerk response from those sympathetic to the target of that grievance is to fire back even louder with "I/they aren't personally aren't part of that problem!". It's a really bizarre display of self-importance trying to suck the oxygen out of the room, but it's also the result of people instantly jumping to tribalism in both the accusation and defense. I commend the prosecution for reminding the jury this case wasn't about the entire police department. It was about one cop. unfortunately I feel if the prosecution didn't give the jury that reminder then their decision making might have weighed more heavily towards the police department, police culture, and possible repercussions well beyond this specific case.

I think when people hear reform they think of the punitive variety if for no other reason than we are a vengeful and spiteful society, but for my reform ideas about the only thing that is punitive is if you are too much of a tough guy then you probably won't be a cop much longer, too tough guy for regular ongoing therapy and retraining on methods to assure everybody involved in a confrontation is seen as human.

I also think we need a lot more "that's understandable". If you are going to spend a lot of your time around a certain group of people behaving badly then it's understandable how you might gain some negative preconceptions about that group of people, and "understandable" doesn't mean its the correct view or you agree with it. It means you can see how they got that view through their experie. You can't deal with that by going "You can't think or say that, you monster! Bottle it up!". You deal with it by talking about it and using methods to counter that negative bias. And to be honest, there are many people who have negative biases who have nowhere near the personal experiences of cops. I'd argue a good percentage of people in this country who have extreme negative feelings about Muslims haven't actually met any beyond just seeing them in public doing normal things we all do. Their entire solid opinion is based on negative media coverage of specific events.
Almost everybody who thinks defund the police will destroy America doesn’t live in a place that NEEDS a movement like defund the police… OR they are among the group of folks who don’t get bothered by police if they DO live in an area like that. Philando Castile was pulled over FORTY-NINE TIMES by police, almost all for minor infractions like a “cracked taillight.” Is this what the police are there for? Just get more traffic cameras. I know white people who drive 80MPH+ everywhere they go and almost never get pulled over.

Defund the police is perhaps an overreaction, but the idea of looking at police budgets, looking at what police are actually doing, and how those things could be done better or more efficiently is just plain good governance. Funny that the same folks who complain about government spending suddenly act offended when anybody wants to look at an out-of-control police or military budget.
 
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