US Hospitals Charge Up To 1,800% Over Cost

Chew Toy McCoy

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I have a friend who worked for 2 hospice supply companies, delivered things like beds, wheelchairs, and oxygen to the dying. The owers of both companies were scumbags who saw it as little more than a cash cow as long as the right medical paperwork was turned in. One owned a bar as his main income and job and the hospice supply was just side money. He got super annoyed if he was called to take care of anything. The other owner eventually got throw in prison for not paying taxes.
 
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Capitalism!
Dunno, I don't think I worked for any such hospital...
We usually consider intpatient care as something that operates at a loss.
Though the disclaimer is I've mainly worked at huge academic medical centers that provide care for huge underserved populations and a lot of the patients didn't have insurance.
 
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I have a friend who worked for 2 hospice supply companies, delivered things like beds, wheelchairs, and oxygen to the dying. The owers of both companies were scumbags who saw it as little more than a cash cow as long as the right medical paperwork was turned in. One owned a bar as his main income and job and the hospice supply was just side money. He got super annoyed if he was called to take care of anything. The other owner eventually got throw in prison for not paying taxes.
I work with dying patients, I've had a very ambivalent experience with hospices. In my region there's a hospice network that it fantastic, the expertise, the accessibility and the compassion is just amazing. Then you deal with some of these places that nickel and dime shit and restrict everything, which lead to patients disenrolling and I personally have to make the calls (emails) to arrange for hospital beds, and other supplies.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Well, I'm from Europe, but I really do believe the a society can be judged by how it treats the less well off, the ill, and the less powerful, and above all, I believe that the provision of healthcare should be a public service, - and publicly funded - rather than viewed as a source of private profit.

To my mind, that ugly nexus between profit and medicine should be severed - and, where this may not prove possible - strictly regulated.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Dunno, I don't think I worked for any such hospital...
We usually consider intpatient care as something that operates at a loss.
Though the disclaimer is I've mainly worked at huge academic medical centers that provide care for huge underserved populations and a lot of the patients didn't have insurance.

Some years back when I didn't have health insurance, after laying in bed for 3 days with severe stomach pain I decided I should probably go get checked out. Out of complete options ignorance I went to the Catholic hospital my extended family had been going to for years. I was there for about a half hour, no major tests run, and they determined it was probably food poisoning. They then slapped me with a $2,500 bill, knocked several hundred off that because I didn't have insurance. Gee, thanks. I should have asked for an itemized bill but I was stupid back then.

Since then I've been to emergency wings at other hospitals that the insuranceless probably go to with their problems. It was like Black Friday at Wal-Mart. The Catholic (just have to mention that twice for some reason) hospital I went to for my food poisoning diagnosis was like an office high-rise on Christmas. I don't recall seeing anybody else there aside from a few employees going out one door and into another.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Well, I'm from Europe, but I really do believe the a society can be judged by how it treats the less well off, the ill, and the less powerful, and above all, I believe that the provision of healthcare should be a public service, - and publicly funded - rather than viewed as a source of private profit.

To my mind, that ugly nexus between profit and medicine should be severed - and, where this may not prove possible - strictly regulated.
I think in the US it's fair to say we judge society by how much shit people own. Those who don't own much shit are an embarrassment that should be hidden from the so much shit owners' eye sight and attention.
 
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Some years back when I didn't have health insurance, after laying in bed for 3 days with severe stomach pain I decided I should probably go get checked out. Out of complete options ignorance I went to the Catholic hospital my extended family had been going to for years. I was there for about a half hour, no major tests run, and they determined it was probably food poisoning. They then slapped me with a $2,500 bill, knocked several hundred off that because I didn't have insurance. Gee, thanks. I should have asked for an itemized bill but I was stupid back then.

Since then I've been to emergency wings at other hospitals that the insuranceless probably go to with their problems. It was like Black Friday at Wal-Mart. The Catholic (just have to mention that twice for some reason) hospital I went to for my food poisoning diagnosis was like an office high-rise on Christmas. I don't recall seeing anybody else there aside from a few employees going out one door and into another.
Checks out... My daughter spent a week in the neonatal ICU out of caution. I paid 20 bucks. The hospital billed my insurance $80K.

My boss uses some of the money donated to her (to clarify it's money she can use for whatever) to pay for the Ubers of patients in said program who couldn't get their care sorted out without transportation help. Either that or we would drive them ourselves... She often spends her own money as well to buy "care packages" for patients. She's absolutely fantastic on every single level, but this is also sad.

Once I tried to figure out getting an out of state patient to our hospital for a special surgery. He couldn't fly and medical transport would have been ~15-20K. Turned out it would have been cheaper for them to buy an old ambulance and drive him over.

Dystopian as fuck.
 
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JayMysteri0

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A new word for me, "subrogation".

Adam Woodrum was out for a bike ride with his wife and kids on July 19 when his son, Robert, who was 9 at the time, crashed.

"He cut himself pretty bad, and I could tell right away he needed stitches," says Woodrum.

Because they were on bikes, he called the fire department in Carson City, Nev.

"They were great," says Woodrum. "They took him on a stretcher to the ER."

Robert received stitches and anesthesia at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center. He's since recovered nicely.

Then the denial letter came.

The patient: Robert Woodrum, covered under his mother's health insurance plan from the Nevada Public Employees' Benefits Program

Total bill: $18,933.44, billed by the hospital

Service provider: Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center, part of not-for-profit Carson Tahoe Health

Medical service: Stitches and anesthesia during an emergency department visit

What gives: The Aug. 4 explanation of benefits (EOB) document said the Woodrums' claim had been rejected and their patient responsibility would be the entire sum of $18,933.44.
 
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A new word for me, "subrogation".
This is probably a clerical error. Probably the visit notes were incomplete and not submitted to the insurance company. Annoying though. This happened to me too with the $80K neonatal ICU stay.
 

DT

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We had a big bill one time, they called, I said, "Oh wow, OK", then they immediately said, "Oh, we can negotiate a smaller amount". Me, "Well, sure, that's great, our cashflow is a little tight right now", Them, "Oh I see, OK, how about $2500".

The original bill was ~$25,000. I mean, not out of pocket, and ultimately, with our insurance, it would've been only a minor difference out of pocket.

The thing that just pisses me off is how easily they just offered a discount of 1/10th the original price. Really? There's a 90% price difference that an account person can just offer up without even really being prompted?

Insanity.
 
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