What are you doing today?

Registered users do not see ads, it's free and easy. Register Here
Registered users do not see ads, it's free and easy. Register Here

Scepticalscribe

Elite Member
Staff member
Posts
2,315
Reaction score
3,606
Awards
1
Indeed. But lovely and warm here with the electric blanket on.

Yes, my electric blanket is on, also.

Mother was also a fan of electric blankets, and indeed, I seem to recall that one year (by request, and/or mutual agreement) my Christmas present took the form of an electric blanket.
 

Clix Pix

Site Champ
Site Donor
Posts
563
Reaction score
1,271
Awards
1
I just did some looking-around and learned that times have definitely changed when it comes to using electric blankets or the newer electric mattress pads! For one thing, the major thing as far as I'm concerned, now it is no longer recommended that someone keep the blanket on all night.... Back in the old days that was the whole idea of an electric blanket: one turned it on to warm up the bed, then got in for a lovely warm night's sleep and in the morning turned the blanket off. Now it looks as though the things shut off automatically after a couple of hours! Interesting! In that case, yes, one would absolutely need to have additional blankets or a duvet on the bed, too, and to me it wouldn't be all that safe to have them piled on top of the electric blanket. I was also surprised to learn about electric mattress pads, as with one of those the inhabitant(s) of the bed would be lying right on top of that electrical device!

Also I noticed in several of the write-ups I was reading that there were warnings NEVER to use a hotwater bottle or anything with liquid in the bed with the electric blanket or electric mattress pad.

Well, I'm cozy and warm enough in my bed with my sheets and blanket and my duvet on top of the blanket..... Sure, it's a bit chilly when I first get into the bed but that goes away fairly quickly. I do like my latest strategy of using a heating pad to warm up my feet while seated at the computer, though -- gets the feet nice and warm and that is more than half the battle so that when I do get into bed my feet aren't old!
 

Gutwrench

Site Champ
Posts
449
Reaction score
606
I sleep with a window open and use an electric blanket. Mine shut off at eight hours. Since I wake up wake several times a night I recycle it on one of them.
 

DT

Elite Member
Posts
1,001
Reaction score
1,887
My French class is coming along well, and I am quite happy with my progress; however, as is always the case, one kicks oneself after a holiday, and needs serious revision (which I spent a few hours on earlier today) to even begin to get back to some sort of speed.

While my vocabulary was always pretty good, I never paid as much attention (at school) to grammar as I should have, which means mastering - or, attempting to master - grammar, or learn grammar properly now; the language has also changed - as all languages do - since I was at school, and seems to have become a bit more informal, or to put more emphasis on informality, at least in speech.

Oh, I had wondered if you spoke any French prior to taking this class you've mentioned. Sounds like you had some formal schooling previously. My wife took a few years, in high school and then college, she busted it out at this fun little French bistro in new york one time, she said she was rusty, but the staff was pretty delighted :) I mean, it doesn't hurt that's she's also charming and sexy and was wearing some dazzling JPG ;)
 

DT

Elite Member
Posts
1,001
Reaction score
1,887
God, I haven't owned or used an electric blanket in decades, though I bet we have one stashed somewhere.

The last couple of days, I was using this neat neck warmer/muscle relaxer, it's like the size of a small scarf, and it's a tube filled with corn, you pop it in the microwave for like 3 minutes and it stays hot for a goodly amount of time, you can drape it over a shoulder, around your neck, I've put it long ways hanging down on my chair so it runs along my spine.

Started working out again, wow, hahaha, I needed a little relief :D
 

P_X

Elite Member
Posts
1,479
Reaction score
2,683
I just did some looking-around and learned that times have definitely changed when it comes to using electric blankets or the newer electric mattress pads! For one thing, the major thing as far as I'm concerned, now it is no longer recommended that someone keep the blanket on all night.... Back in the old days that was the whole idea of an electric blanket: one turned it on to warm up the bed, then got in for a lovely warm night's sleep and in the morning turned the blanket off. Now it looks as though the things shut off automatically after a couple of hours! Interesting! In that case, yes, one would absolutely need to have additional blankets or a duvet on the bed, too, and to me it wouldn't be all that safe to have them piled on top of the electric blanket. I was also surprised to learn about electric mattress pads, as with one of those the inhabitant(s) of the bed would be lying right on top of that electrical device!

Also I noticed in several of the write-ups I was reading that there were warnings NEVER to use a hotwater bottle or anything with liquid in the bed with the electric blanket or electric mattress pad.

Well, I'm cozy and warm enough in my bed with my sheets and blanket and my duvet on top of the blanket..... Sure, it's a bit chilly when I first get into the bed but that goes away fairly quickly. I do like my latest strategy of using a heating pad to warm up my feet while seated at the computer, though -- gets the feet nice and warm and that is more than half the battle so that when I do get into bed my feet aren't old!
There's a natural, planned temp drop in non-REM sleep. According to some studies *a significant* promoter of non-REM deep sleep is temp drop on its own, so getting in a nice warm bed may be pretty good, but staying warm all night eliminates the temp drop and interfere with deep sleep. Just like alcohol before bedtime does...
 

Scepticalscribe

Elite Member
Staff member
Posts
2,315
Reaction score
3,606
Awards
1
Oh, I had wondered if you spoke any French prior to taking this class you've mentioned. Sounds like you had some formal schooling previously. My wife took a few years, in high school and then college, she busted it out at this fun little French bistro in new york one time, she said she was rusty, but the staff was pretty delighted :) I mean, it doesn't hurt that's she's also charming and sexy and was wearing some dazzling JPG ;)

I studied French at secondary school (High School) for a number of years and achieved pretty good grades, but, that was quite some time ago.

Candidly, I never took the study of French all that seriously until my mother arranged an exchange for me as a teenager to stay with an incredibly warm, welcoming, cultured, intellectual and incredibly accomplished French family who lived (still live) in the centre of Paris, (in a stunning old apartment on the banks of the Seine on the Île de la Cité), where I realised that people actually spoke - and used - this extraordinary language every single day of their lives.

That visit - which absolutely blew my mind, and made me a passionate Francophile for years - was a sort of epiphany for me, and set standards in how I wanted to live my life which still inform many of my cultural and other choices, decades later.
 

DT

Elite Member
Posts
1,001
Reaction score
1,887
There's a natural, planned temp drop in non-REM sleep. According to some studies *a significant* promoter of non-REM deep sleep is temp drop on its own, so getting in a nice warm bed may be pretty good, but staying warm all night eliminates the temp drop and interfere with deep sleep. Just like alcohol before bedtime does...

Yes! I read an article about this, they recommended layers of sheets/covers, since you naturally through the course of the night tend to regulate, and seek a lower temp.

That's why I go to sleep under several comforters, wearing wool pajamas, but wake up with all the covers on the floor, and totally naked ...
 

Alli

Thread Starter
Elite Member
Staff member
Site Donor
Posts
2,264
Reaction score
4,177
Maybe this is why I can sleep for 12 hours. I keep the window open and usually keep the fan on, even when it’s in the 40’s. No electric blanket. Ugh.
 

lizkat

Elite Member
Site Donor
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
2,419
Reaction score
5,475
Awards
1
Maybe this is why I can sleep for 12 hours. I keep the window open and usually keep the fan on, even when it’s in the 40’s. No electric blanket. Ugh.

Yah, I like a pretty cold room for sleeping. The upstairs of my house is not heated directly, i.e. no floor registers with short duct through to ceiling registers in the rooms below. So in winter I just layer up bedding with flannel sheet, thermal blanket (repeat those two if it's really cold outside), wool-blend-batted quilt, twill spread and a comforter. First couple minutes are interesting, sorta like camping out in the fall when you take your boots off and get into a sleeping bag, but after that it's fine and I often wake up having tossed the comforter aside. I don't linger upstairs in the winter mornings though, brrrrrrrr!
 

Clix Pix

Site Champ
Site Donor
Posts
563
Reaction score
1,271
Awards
1
Yes, I have a duvet/comforter, a couple of thin blankets under that (just recently added that second blanket as the weather has become colder) and two top sheets (for colorful decoration more than function actually, as of course one sheet would do just fine!), and this all keeps me nice and cozy during the night. I turn down the thermostat to around 64 or so at nighttime, as I prefer a cool room for sleeping, too. Yes, sometimes I will awaken during the night and be a bit too warm -- now I know why, it's that REM sleep thingy! :)
 

Scepticalscribe

Elite Member
Staff member
Posts
2,315
Reaction score
3,606
Awards
1
Occasionally, very occasionally, (even in the deepest, darkest, depths of winter) - for I have an extraordinary tolerance for heat and warmth, and loathe the cold - I will awake, to find myself feeling surprisingly and unusually warm, sufficiently surprisingly and unusually warm to give fleeting - very fleeting, and swiftly dismissed - thought to removing a duvet or two.

So, that's why.

Fascinating.
 

DT

Elite Member
Posts
1,001
Reaction score
1,887
Yah, I like a pretty cold room for sleeping. The upstairs of my house is not heated directly, i.e. no floor registers with short duct through to ceiling registers in the rooms below. So in winter I just layer up bedding with flannel sheet, thermal blanket (repeat those two if it's really cold outside), wool-blend-batted quilt, twill spread and a comforter. First couple minutes are interesting, sorta like camping out in the fall when you take your boots off and get into a sleeping bag, but after that it's fine and I often wake up having tossed the comforter aside. I don't linger upstairs in the winter mornings though, brrrrrrrr!

We have a the opposite issue, the design/vents/etc., of the house + HVAC causes the upstairs to be a good bit warmer. So when I'm doing a late night downstairs and it's cold, I crank up the heat, the bedroom is like a sauna :D
 
Registered users do not see ads, it's free and easy. Register Here
Top Bottom