Police Is Immune To Negligent Homicide Charges

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Mr. Prude, 41, was visiting his brother in Rochester in March when he had an apparent psychotic episode. He ran into the street naked and was handcuffed by officers. Mr. Prude, who had told at least one passer-by that he had the coronavirus, began spitting, and the officers responded by pulling a mesh hood over his head.
When he tried to get up, the officers forced Mr. Prude facedown on the ground, one of them pushing his head to the pavement, police body camera footage showed. The police held Mr. Prude down for two minutes, and he had to be resuscitated. He died in the hospital a week later, on March 30. His death was later ruled a homicide.

But the circumstances of Mr. Prude’s death did not become public until September, and only after lawyers for his family pushed for the release of body camera footage. “These incidents have challenged public trust and confidence in our criminal justice system, and history has unfortunately repeated itself once again in the death of Daniel Prude,” Ms. James said. But her announcement confirmed that there would be no charges for any of the seven officers involved: Officers Josiah Harris, Francisco Santiago, Paul Ricotta, Andrew Specksgoor, Mark Vaughn and Troy Taladay and Sgt. Michael Magri.

Records released in an internal review of the episode appeared to show that city officials had tried for months to suppress video footage of the encounter, and misrepresented the cause of his death.
“We certainly do not want people to misinterpret the officers’ actions and conflate this incident with any recent killings of unarmed Black men by law enforcement nationally,” a deputy police chief wrote in a June 4 email to his boss, advising him not to release the footage to the Prude family’s lawyer. “That would simply be a false narrative, and could create animosity and potentially violent blowback in this community as a result.”
The police chief replied minutes later: “I totally agree.”

For months, Mr. Prude’s death had been presented in police accounts as a fatal drug overdose. In his autopsy, Mr. Prude was found to have PCP, also known as angel dust, in his system. But the cause of Mr. Prude’s death, the medical examiner determined, was asphyxia.


This is the case that got me fed up with Seddy's BS. Some of those brainacs at MR posted a webMD link to explain away the autopsy report's findings....
TBH, PCP can make the airways more reactive, so I think what happened here is that he smoked a joint, it was laced with PCP, he went into a dissociative psychotic episode secondary to PCP intoxication. He then met the cops, was spitting and saying he had COVID. Cops put a spit sock on his head, while keeping him seated on the freezing ground in the middle of snow flurries. He was trying to get up so cops held him down...like this:

1614120824004.png


(See full upper body weight on the head....). He threw up and aspirated his stomach content, his bronchi may have been more reactive and constricted harder due to the PCP, but the fact is that his oxygen was cut off and he suffered anoxic brain injury followed by brain swelling, downward herniation and brain death. He was already brain dead when they packed him in the ambulance.

I'd be willing to consider the cops' viewpoint if they didn't do the maneuver depicted above. If you have a wet cloth on someone's face and you put 100 pounds of weight on the person's head, you know you can kill the person. if you can expect a toddler to understand this, there is no excuse for any adult.
 

SuperMatt

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This is the case that got me fed up with Seddy's BS. Some of those brainacs at MR posted a webMD link to explain away the autopsy report's findings....
TBH, PCP can make the airways more reactive, so I think what happened here is that he smoked a joint, it was laced with PCP, he went into a dissociative psychotic episode secondary to PCP intoxication. He then met the cops, was spitting and saying he had COVID. Cops put a spit sock on his head, while keeping him seated on the freezing ground in the middle of snow flurries. He was trying to get up so cops held him down...like this:

1614120824004.png


(See full upper body weight on the head....). He threw up and aspirated his stomach content, his bronchi may have been more reactive and constricted harder due to the PCP, but the fact is that his oxygen was cut off and he suffered anoxic brain injury followed by brain swelling, downward herniation and brain death. He was already brain dead when they packed him in the ambulance.

I'd be willing to consider the cops' viewpoint if they didn't do the maneuver depicted above. If you have a wet cloth on someone's face and you put 100 pounds of weight on the person's head, you know you can kill the person. if you can expect a toddler to understand this, there is no excuse for any adult.
This behavior by cops is ok. It’s the victims, their families, and the affected communities protesting in the streets that is the REAL problem, and absolutely equivalent, if not WORSE than the Capitol insurrection… according to right-wing ”logic.”
 
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User.45

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This behavior by cops is ok. It’s the victims, their families, and the affected communities protesting in the streets that is the REAL problem, and absolutely equivalent, if not WORSE than the Capitol insurrection… according to right-wing ”logic.”
yup...

What makes me sad about this is nobody's telling this cop or his chauvinist colleague in MN that "hey, be more mindful, this is a human and also mortal."
 
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