Why Shouldn’t I Move to Ireland?

Huntn

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A serious question. My impression is that the cost of living is relatively low, but what do I know? Educate me! :) And of course I’m about to launch myself into casually researching the question.
 

Pumbaa

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I’ll be in the South, but what is going on there? Yes, I’m a bit out of touch but remember reading something about some kind of unrest, Brexit? Old wounds?
Consequences of Brexit. Restricting the land border between Ireland and Northern Ireland would most likely result in a return to the old ways of violence and terrorism. Nobody wants that, so promises were made. Lots of promises actually. Conflicting promises. Doesn’t look promising IMHO.

 

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A serious question. My impression is that the cost of living is relatively low, but what do I know? Educate me! :) And of course I’m about to launch myself into casually researching the question.

@Huntn: The cost of living is not low, neither relatively, nor absolutely.

Ireland is one of the richer (and more expensive) countries in western Europe, the EU.

By western European standards, the cost of living was low in ROI (Republic of Ireland) 30 or 40 years ago; not now.

The situation in the north will get really messy.

"Really messy", no, or, not quite yet, but, nevertheless, I would certainly consider it to be rather unsettled, at the moment - and yes, Brexit is deeply destabilising (and remember, Northern Ireland actually voted by a narrow margin to Remain).

Consequences of Brexit. Restricting the land border between Ireland and Northern Ireland would most likely result in a return to the old ways of violence and terrorism. Nobody wants that, so promises were made. Lots of promises actually. Conflicting promises. Doesn’t look promising IMHO.

"Most likely" (return to violence)? Not necessarily.

But, perhaps, a return to some sort of destabilising violence? Very possible.
 

Pumbaa

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@Huntn: The cost of living is not low, neither relatively, nor absolutely.

Ireland is one of the richer (and more expensive) countries in western Europe, the EU.



"Really messy", no, or, not quite yet, but, nevertheless, I would certainly consider it to be rather unsettled, at the moment - and yes, Brexit is deeply destabilising (and remember, Northern Ireland actually voted by a narrow margin to Remain).


"Most likely" (return to violence)? Not necessarily.

But, perhaps, a return to some sort of destabilising violence? Very possible.
Thanks for the optimism. Needed that today. 😊
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Consequences of Brexit. Restricting the land border between Ireland and Northern Ireland would most likely result in a return to the old ways of violence and terrorism. Nobody wants that, so promises were made. Lots of promises actually. Conflicting promises. Doesn’t look promising IMHO.



Oh. I thought you were going to say that Bono was planning to throw another benefit music festival that doesn't address or acknowledge the actual source of problems or offer any long-term solutions but drops off pallets with a few months of supplies instead.

But what you said sounds much, much worse.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Thanks for the optimism. Needed that today. 😊

I know Ireland (and indeed, the EU) very well.

Re Northern Ireland, uniquely, the Protocol allows it advantages of both membership of the EU (thanks to the provisions of the Good Friday Agreement, - citizens of NI can claim Irish citizenship, British citizenship, or both - this enables them to lay claim to membership of/ownership of, both traditions - and their accompanying rights - simultaneously, and which also allowed for these exemptions to be adopted under EU Law) and whatever advantages may accrue as a result of Brexit.

While some Unionists may find the "sovereignty" or "union" arguments emotionally compelling, my view is that business, commerce and much of whatever industry exists in Northern Ireland (from both communities) will see the advantages of being able to trade with the EU as though they were still in the Single Market, and, thus, as a consequence, may be less willing to support the British Government in its reckless desire to wreck the Protocol.

That is not to say that society in Northern Ireland is stable; it is not, but it is a lot better than what it was, when the ceasefire was agreed, in the 1990s.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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Oh. I thought you were going to say that Bono was planning to throw another benefit music festival that doesn't address or acknowledge the actual source of problems or offer any long-term solutions but drops off pallets with a few months of supplies instead.

But what you said sounds much, much worse.

Bono doesn't pay his taxes in Ireland - he uses some elaborate vehicle in the Netherlands to do the needful - and hence, some in Ireland find his criticism of the Irish Government's short comings re foreign aid - and his lectures on same - just a little rich.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

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Bono doesn't pay his taxes in Ireland - he uses some elaborate vehicle in the Netherlands to do the needful - and hence, some in Ireland find his criticism of the Irish Government's short comings re foreign aid - and his lectures on same - just a little rich.

So when it comes to tax avoidance for the rich there's even an Ireland for Ireland. 😯
 

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So when it comes to tax avoidance for the rich there's even an Ireland for Ireland. 😯

Which says a lot about Bono.

However, the days of the interesting - and ethically questionable - tax arrangements in Ireland are drawing to a close; EU pressure (and the EU gave Ireland total support during the Brexit negotiations) - and, to a lesser extent, US pressure - will see to that.
 

ericwn

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@Huntn: The cost of living is not low, neither relatively, nor absolutely.

Ireland is one of the richer (and more expensive) countries in western Europe, the EU.

By western European standards, the cost of living was low in ROI (Republic of Ireland) 30 or 40 years ago; not now.



"Really messy", no, or, not quite yet, but, nevertheless, I would certainly consider it to be rather unsettled, at the moment - and yes, Brexit is deeply destabilising (and remember, Northern Ireland actually voted by a narrow margin to Remain).


"Most likely" (return to violence)? Not necessarily.

But, perhaps, a return to some sort of destabilising violence? Very possible.

Pretty much same thoughts all around.
I’ve lived in the republic for over a decade and don’t expect the violence of the last century to return.
 

ericwn

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A nice house at the west cost somewhere in the ROI - somewhere in the countryside- I’d love that. One has to be ok with not having seasons of course. :)
 
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