Woman says she put fruit juice inside travel mug. Lawsuit ensues

fooferdoggie

Elite Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
3,088
Reaction score
5,129

so somehow Walmart is supposed to know this can happen??? I am sure on the table id says don't put pop in the thing.​

A travel mug's top exploded after juice fermented inside. The mug's Braintree owner is suing Walmart.​


Walmart should have known that the bottle tops can explode if there is increased pressure in the bottle and that leaving juice or "liquid contents" in the bottle for an extended period of time could cause pressure to accumulate, the lawsuit states.
 

SuperMatt

Site Master
Posts
7,779
Reaction score
14,777

so somehow Walmart is supposed to know this can happen??? I am sure on the table id says don't put pop in the thing.​

A travel mug's top exploded after juice fermented inside. The mug's Braintree owner is suing Walmart.​


Walmart should have known that the bottle tops can explode if there is increased pressure in the bottle and that leaving juice or "liquid contents" in the bottle for an extended period of time could cause pressure to accumulate, the lawsuit states.
Maybe they will be forced to include basic science textbooks with every water bottle purchase? I think you’ve definitely got biology and physics lessons here, and perhaps a wee bit of chemistry to explain the byproducts of the biological processes.
 

fooferdoggie

Elite Member
Vaccinated
Site Donor
Posts
3,088
Reaction score
5,129
Maybe they will be forced to include basic science textbooks with every water bottle purchase? I think you’ve definitely got biology and physics lessons here, and perhaps a wee bit of chemistry to explain the byproducts of the biological processes.
well at least she could drink the contents and numb herself to the pain.
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Vaccinated
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
6,783
Reaction score
14,126
Location
Catskill Mountains
Yuck! You would think that before putting away the backpack the woman would've, as a matter of course, taken the travel mug out of the backpack and washed it in anticipation of the next use, rather than just letting it sit in there for ten days.


Used to think we were entertaining ourselves to death. Now it might be more like suffocating in paperwork of frivolous litigation, even after almost suffocating in legalese of user manuals telling people not to do stupid stuff like fall asleep in a bathtub while wearing a bonnet-style electric hairdryer. Where does it all end?

Sometimes people will do stupid things and they get hurt or die. True, it can be tragic. In rural areas there's an old and ugly saying that all farm ponds bear the bones of at least a few curious toddlers. We've come past that (big maybe) in the 21st century, and definitely past some other formerly common childhood hazards, to the point where a kid may be more likely to die from cracking his head on the corner of a coffee table than from being unsecured in a crashing car, inhaling tiny toy parts or getting head stuck in crib rails. There's a need and place for safety regulations and also sometimes for the the lawsuits that have had to force compliance from industry.

But when it comes to stuff like an adult suing over ill effects of inadvertently converting an unsuitable vessel into a fermentation chamber? Hope the judge throws it out of court with an opinion worthy of gong viral on social media.
 

Herdfan

Resident Redneck
Vaccinated
Posts
3,240
Reaction score
2,476
Used to think we were entertaining ourselves to death. Now it might be more like suffocating in paperwork of frivolous litigation, even after almost suffocating in legalese of user manuals telling people not to do stupid stuff like fall asleep in a bathtub while wearing a bonnet-style electric hairdryer. Where does it all end?

Sometimes people will do stupid things and they get hurt or die. True, it can be tragic. In rural areas there's an old and ugly saying that all farm ponds bear the bones of at least a few curious toddlers. We've come past that (big maybe) in the 21st century, and definitely past some other formerly common childhood hazards, to the point where a kid may be more likely to die from cracking his head on the corner of a coffee table than from being unsecured in a crashing car, inhaling tiny toy parts or getting head stuck in crib rails. There's a need and place for safety regulations and also sometimes for the the lawsuits that have had to force compliance from industry.

But when it comes to stuff like an adult suing over ill effects of inadvertently converting an unsuitable vessel into a fermentation chamber? Hope the judge throws it out of court with an opinion worthy of gong viral on social media.

When my daughter went to elementary school, there was a kid in her class with a severe peanut allergy, so peanuts and peanut butter were banned from her classroom. Wife and I were talking about it and she wondered why she didn't remember peanut allergies from when we were in school. My answer was because the kids died mysteriously before they made it to school age. Probably some truth to that.

There is a meme going around about how we are dumber as a society because 50 years ago the manual for your car told you how to adjust the valves. Today it tells you not to drink the contents of the battery. :ROFLMAO:

I want to know what kind of attorney took this case.
 

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Vaccinated
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
6,783
Reaction score
14,126
Location
Catskill Mountains
When my daughter went to elementary school, there was a kid in her class with a severe peanut allergy, so peanuts and peanut butter were banned from her classroom. Wife and I were talking about it and she wondered why she didn't remember peanut allergies from when we were in school. My answer was because the kids died mysteriously before they made it to school age. Probably some truth to that.

There is a meme going around about how we are dumber as a society because 50 years ago the manual for your car told you how to adjust the valves. Today it tells you not to drink the contents of the battery. :ROFLMAO:

I want to know what kind of attorney took this case.

Yah I was in my 30s before I knew anyone with a severe peanut allergy, a guy at work who carried an EpiPen against possibility of anaphylactic shock from inadvertent exposure. Even so, he self-described as "paranoid" when he joined colleagues at restaurants, even if he often imported something like an apple or a banana to have at table while the rest of us chowed down food without concern over ingredients.

But one of my kin in the next gen developed a strong allergy to both chicken and beans in his youth, and since learning of that I've wondered how many kids of my age, back in childhood --when it was still common to be told to "clean your dinner plate or no apple pie!"-- ended up asphyxiated from trying to comply, and may have been diagnosed post mortem as having "choked on the food". I know it wasn't until the mid-1940s that food allergy warnings started popping up on labels of some processed foods. Before then references to "allergies" usually meant "hay fever".

I can see lawsuits over labeling errors that still occasionally occur when a recipe is changed and the label isn't modifed appropriately, or when a production plant switches up the labels for a run of a different product in the same type of container, e.g. variably flavored noodle bowls or soups, and the first few containers of the new stuff have the prior run's product labels because of how the labeling or container machinery is stocked. That's a QA issue and the stuff of nightmarish voluntary recalls...
 

Scepticalscribe

Site Master
Vaccinated
Posts
6,531
Reaction score
9,289
Yah I was in my 30s before I knew anyone with a severe peanut allergy, a guy at work who carried an EpiPen against possibility of anaphylactic shock from inadvertent exposure. Even so, he self-described as "paranoid" when he joined colleagues at restaurants, even if he often imported something like an apple or a banana to have at table while the rest of us chowed down food without concern over ingredients.

But one of my kin in the next gen developed a strong allergy to both chicken and beans in his youth, and since learning of that I've wondered how many kids of my age, back in childhood --when it was still common to be told to "clean your dinner plate or no apple pie!"-- ended up asphyxiated from trying to comply, and may have been diagnosed post mortem as having "choked on the food". I know it wasn't until the mid-1940s that food allergy warnings started popping up on labels of some processed foods. Before then references to "allergies" usually meant "hay fever".

I can see lawsuits over labeling errors that still occasionally occur when a recipe is changed and the label isn't modifed appropriately, or when a production plant switches up the labels for a run of a different product in the same type of container, e.g. variably flavored noodle bowls or soups, and the first few containers of the new stuff have the prior run's product labels because of how the labeling or container machinery is stocked. That's a QA issue and the stuff of nightmarish voluntary recalls...

Around twenty five years ago, I asked my then boss (possibly the best boss I have ever worked for, before he became an academic, he had been a scientist, and had written high school text books, a wise, witty, extraordinarily well travelled, thoughtful, generous, kind and humane individual), his thoughts on this, and his reply was that - in earlier eras, with less travel, less trade, (in earlier centuries, many people never moved more than 20 miles or km from their place of birth in their entire lives, unless wars or conflict or disease may have compelled them to do so), the diet of the vast majority of the population (the rich were always different) was limited to food - usually locally sourced - that they had always consumed, and they had adapted to it, and that people were not exposed to the variety (and choice) of foods that are widely available now.

Most people in the western world - certainly in Europe - had never met a peanut until well into the twentieth century, he remarked, so whatever allergy they might have had wouldn't ever have been triggered or discovered in the course of their lives.
 
Last edited:

Scepticalscribe

Site Master
Vaccinated
Posts
6,531
Reaction score
9,289
Re the subject matter of the OP, the woman is clearly an idiot & - in common with other posters - I sincerely hope that whatever judge presides over this case throws it out of court.

Anyway, I once worked with an utter imbecile, a complete moron who reacted with incredulity and disbelief when a can of Coca-cola which he had kept (for days) - which he subsequently claimed he had forgotten about - in the glove compartment of his EU mission vehicle (a Toyota Landcruiser) in the summer in Georgia (Caucasus Georgia) where summer (such "summers" last for around two months) temperatures exceed 40-42C - (104-107F) exploded leaving an indescribable mess.
 
Last edited:

lizkat

Deep deep blue
Vaccinated
Top Poster Of Month
Posts
6,783
Reaction score
14,126
Location
Catskill Mountains
Re the subject matter of the OP, the woman is clearly an idiot & - in common with other posters - I sincerely hope that whatever judge presides over this case throws it out of court.

Anyway, I once worked with an utter imbecile, a complete moron who reacted with incredulity and disbelief when a can of Coca-cola which he had kept (for days) - which he claimed he had forgotten - in the glove compartment of his EU mission vehicle (a Toyota Landcruiser) in the summer in Georgia (Caucasus Georgia) where summer temperatures exceed 40-42C - (104-107F) exploded leaving an indescribable mess.

Wow. I've only ever seen the flip side of that temperature wise, where a 2-liter plastic container of soda was set out on the back step to "chill" a little during a winter gathering. It surely chilled efficiently at -20Fº (-29ºC) and then promptly exploded: nowhere for the expelled CO2 to go (ice can't hold as much as the liquid does) and the cap seal was still factory-intact, so it just went off like a bomb and shattered the container itself.
 
Top Bottom