Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

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Scepticalscribe

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This evening's dish was a fish rendang: It comprised monkfish fillets that had been defrosted and marinated in freshly squeezed lemon juice (I didn't have lime), salt and brown sugar for the best part of twenty minutes.

First, roughly sliced onions and red peppers were sautéed, then rendang paste - a few dessertspoons - were added and sautéed, a roughly chopped chilli pepper and thumb of ginger added, - gently sautéed - followed by coconut milk, and stock with Asian fish sauce which were both then added.

That was allowed to simmer away for around twenty minutes, after which I added the monkfish, (and its marinade) for a further seven to ten minutes or so.

Served with basmati rice.
 
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Alli

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This evening's dish was a fish rendang: It comprised monkfish fillets that had been defrosted and marinated in freshly squeezed lemon juice (I didn't have lime), salt and brown sugar for the best part of twenty minutes.
It’s funny to me that people have to defrost fish or seafood. Living where I do, if it wasn’t caught this morning, it’s no good. It’s the thing I love most about living on the gulf coast.
 

hulugu

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This evening's dish was a fish rendang: It comprised monkfish fillets that had been defrosted and marinated in freshly squeezed lemon juice (I didn't have lime), salt and brown sugar for the best part of twenty minutes.

First, roughly sliced onions and red peppers were sautéed, then rendang paste - a few dessertspoons - were added and sautéed, a roughly chopped chilli pepper and thumb of ginger added, - gently sautéed - followed by coconut milk, and stock with Asian fish sauce which were both then added.

That was allowed to simmer away for around twenty minutes, after which I added the monkfish, (and its marinade) for a further seven to ten minutes or so.

Served with basmati rice.

Oh nice. I'm making a tamale pie with roasted pork.
 

hulugu

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It’s funny to me that people have to defrost fish or seafood. Living where I do, if it wasn’t caught this morning, it’s no good. It’s the thing I love most about living on the gulf coast.
The closest point for fresh seafood is Puerto Penasco, aka Rocky Point, in Sonora. Not a bad trip for a day, and definitely a good place for ceviche and fish tacos.
 

Scepticalscribe

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This evening's dinner will be fish rendang (seconds from yesterday), recipe as follows:
It comprised monkfish fillets that had been defrosted and marinated in freshly squeezed lemon juice (I didn't have lime), salt and brown sugar for the best part of twenty minutes.

First, roughly sliced onions and red peppers were sautéed, then rendang paste - a few dessertspoons - were added and sautéed, a roughly chopped chilli pepper and thumb of ginger added, - gently sautéed - followed by coconut milk, and stock with Asian fish sauce which were both then added.

That was allowed to simmer away for around twenty minutes, after which I added the monkfish, (and its marinade) for a further seven to ten minutes or so.

And Indonesian rice: First,"old rice" (yesterday's left over basmati - I deliberately made extra).

Finely diced onions and carrots (organic) sautéed, to which a cup of peas (from the freezer, but defrosted earlier) are added, and sautéed until soft; seasoned with sea salt and black pepper.

Then, the spices are added: a grated thumb of ginger (still haven't managed to remember to buy galangal), and a finely diced chilli pepper plus a full head of minced garlic, all sautéed, and a little brown sugar. And finely chopped French onions.

Eggs (free range, organic) have already been whisked; then, they are added to the pan and scrambled.

This is when the old rice is added, and fried, and sautéed (even toasted); at this point, I made a well in the rice, and added some sambal paste, and some rendang paste into the well, and fried them off, and then stirred the rice through them. Once that has been done, a dessertspoon (or two) of kecap manis, sweet Indonesian soy sauce, is added and fried off, and stirred and mixed through the rice.

And that is when dinner is served.
 
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lizkat

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It’s funny to me that people have to defrost fish or seafood. Living where I do, if it wasn’t caught this morning, it’s no good. It’s the thing I love most about living on the gulf coast.

Fresh seafood was what I loved when we lived in Maryland in the early 1950s for awhile, with the lawn rolling right down to an inlet off the Chesapeake Bay. Crab fisherman would pull up to our docks and boathouse sometimes to escape typically abrupt signs of a storm... and leave us part of their live catch in exchange for shelter. Mmmmm.
 

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Roasted root vegetables - the golden and orange autumnal colours are amazing - plus roasted tomatoes (in the same copper roasting tin).

So, to ingredients (all organic): Two heads of garlic, carrots, parsnips, onions, golden beets, sweet potato, and tomatoes, roasted in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and black pepper.
 

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Roasted root vegetables - the golden and orange autumnal colours are amazing - plus roasted tomatoes (in the same copper roasting tin).

So, to ingredients (all organic): Two heads of garlic, carrots, parsnips, onions, golden beets, sweet potato, and tomatoes, roasted in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and black pepper.

Very tasty, and I served it with two dips:

My own homemade Sriracha dip: Sriracha sauce, plus creme fraiche and double cream;

And: Creme fraiche, double cream, sea salt, brown sugar.
 

Alli

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Roasted root vegetables - the golden and orange autumnal colours are amazing - plus roasted tomatoes (in the same copper roasting tin).

So, to ingredients (all organic): Two heads of garlic, carrots, parsnips, onions, golden beets, sweet potato, and tomatoes, roasted in olive oil and seasoned with sea salt and black pepper.
My kind of meal. Tonight I sautéed onions, garlic, and one white and one sweet potato. Served that as a side to Beyond burgers. Delish.
 

hulugu

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I knocked out a simple homemade ramen with some left over beef and whatever vegetables were in the fridge. Also, salsa because we had some chiles to use up.
I've got some beans on the slow-cooker for huevos rancheros in the morning, and I made a cocktail with hibiscus syrup and Topo Chico.
 

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Nasi Goreng: Spicy Indonesian fried rice: Very finely diced carrots, onions, grated ginger (around a thumb), minced garlic (a mere eight cloves), a very finely chopped chilli pepper, a half cup (a Le Creuset mug, not the formal US measurement) of defrosted frozen peas, chopped French onions, some chopped, poached, chicken thighs (organic, free range), - I had poached several yesterday - organic, free range eggs (whisked), day old basmati rice, rendang paste, sambal oelek, and kecap manis (sweet Indonesian soy sauce).
 
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hulugu

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Nasi Goreng: Spicy Indonesian fried rice: Very finely diced carrots, onions, grated ginger (around a thumb), minced garlic (a mere eight cloves), a very finely chopped chilli pepper, a half cup (a Le Creuset mug, not the formal US measurement) of defrosted frozen peas, chopped French onions, some chopped, poached, chicken thighs (organic, free range), - I had poached several yesterday - organic, free range eggs (whisked), day old basmati rice, rendang paste, sambal oelek, and kecap manis (sweet Indonesian soy sauce).

I like that you describe the meal, while I'm like "homemade ramen."

Finely-diced carrots, grated ginger, minced garlic sautéed and sauce—oyster sauce, soy, fish sauce, and chili garlic. Add in chicken stock, and boil with bok choy. Then, I took some left-over beef that was reversed seared, sliced into thin planks and then soaked them in the boiling ramen soup for a bit. Add in 6-minute eggs that are soaked in soy and mirin, and finish with sesame seeds and green onions, and a hint of Sriracha.

It's not authentic or traditional, but it's a 30-minute recipe that makes a nice ramen soup.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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I like that you describe the meal, while I'm like "homemade ramen."

Finely-diced carrots, grated ginger, minced garlic sautéed and sauce—oyster sauce, soy, fish sauce, and chili garlic. Add in chicken stock, and boil with bok choy. Then, I took some left-over beef that was reversed seared, sliced into thin planks and then soaked them in the boiling ramen soup for a bit. Add in 6-minute eggs that are soaked in soy and mirin, and finish with sesame seeds and green onions, and a hint of Sriracha.

It's not authentic or traditional, but it's a 30-minute recipe that makes a nice ramen soup.

Sounds delicious, and thanks for sharing.

I usually describe not just the ingredients, but also the process, or method, as anyone who wishes to copy the dish, or try it out for themselves, can then feel free to try to do so.
 

hulugu

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Sounds delicious, and thanks for sharing.

I usually describe not just the ingredients, but also the process, or method, as anyone who wishes to copy the dish, or try it out for themselves, can then feel free to try to do so.

Yeah, that's a really good idea.

My son helped with the salsa. First, we roasted several chiles—Anaheim, Serrano and jalapeño—on the range. Then, we took canned tomatoes, salt, sugar, cilantro, onion and garlic and blended that together with the chiles.

It came out a little hot for my wife's taste, but the boy and I ate some with chilaquiles for lunch. We're getting to the end of a grocery run, so I always take dried out corn tortillas and slice them into triangles and fry them in a little oil.

Then, take the newly-made chips and sauté with some vegetables. Add a little tomato paste. Whip up some eggs in a bowl, and then pour that onto the chips and vegetables, and then grate some cheese on top. I prefer the fresh cheese from the Mexican market, but my kid likes colby jack better, so I tend to make a mix of both.

Kids are funny. He eats these homemade meals that span several cultures and a couple of continents, and when I asked him what we should do for dinner, he wants pizza delivered.
 

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My son helped with the salsa. First, we roasted several chiles—Anaheim, Serrano and jalapeño—on the range. Then, we took canned tomatoes, salt, sugar, cilantro, onion and garlic and blended that together with the chiles.
Roasting the veggies first makes for a much more flavorful salsa.
 

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This evening dinner was both simple, and tasty.

Sautéed eggs (free range, organic), fresh ciabatta with butter, and homemade (though not by me) raspberry jam, and coffee (central American) with organic hot milk.
 

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On another forum in which I hang out, someone -- a foodie -- described how he had prepared an Ethiopian meal of Injera and Doro Wat -- it really looked delicious! There are several Ethiopian restaurants downtown in DC -- large Ethiopian population -- but I've never had their food. Maybe when/if things settle down and restaurants are open under more normal conditions, I might find a place to have a new taste experience. Looks and sounds really good, with various spices and the Injera, which is a sourdough sort of flatbread. Rather than use utensils the diner scoops up the Doro Was with the Injera. Since you folks here in this thread are presumably all fond of messing around in the kitchen, I thought I'd mention this intriguing dish, and maybe if some of you haven't prepared it or enjoyed it you might be interested in giving it a try! The guy on Nikon Cafe said he found several good recipes online.
 

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On another forum in which I hang out, someone -- a foodie -- described how he had prepared an Ethiopian meal of Injera and Doro Wat -- it really looked delicious! There are several Ethiopian restaurants downtown in DC -- large Ethiopian population -- but I've never had their food. Maybe when/if things settle down and restaurants are open under more normal conditions, I might find a place to have a new taste experience. Looks and sounds really good, with various spices and the Injera, which is a sourdough sort of flatbread. Rather than use utensils the diner scoops up the Doro Was with the Injera. Since you folks here in this thread are presumably all fond of messing around in the kitchen, I thought I'd mention this intriguing dish, and maybe if some of you haven't prepared it or enjoyed it you might be interested in giving it a try! The guy on Nikon Cafe said he found several good recipes online.

I've heard of it, - and read about it - but never tried it, or seen it on a menu.

Some of the "wats" (basically, spicy stews) can be very hot, and very spicy, from what I have read.

I must see if I can attempt to replicate a version of this dish sometime.

Has the chap on Nikon Cafe recommended any specific version of this recipe?
 
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