Garden and Yard Talk

Huntn

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Update : project complete with 2 dwarf Acomo Crape Myrtle bushes to be shaped as trees, 3 decorative grasses, and wild flower seeds planted. Let’s see what happens. :)

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Landscaping finished, watching for wildflowers to pop.
Hopefully the straw bed will not adversely effect wildflower seeds.
They were put down first.
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Acoma Crape Myrtle about 10’ tall will have to be pruned up for this narrow space.​
Wildflowers were rearing to go, in fact some seeds we are planting are popping virtually within 48 hours. April has been glorious, today in the 60s.

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fooferdoggie

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our back yard /bank is not the greatest soil and the tree roots are in the way of planting. Plus course pretty much full shade. some ferns did well some ok some died over the last few years. I have bought so many different species the word fern native to this are have done the best. they jsut sat there for a year before growing. some babies though not a lot. thew grown cover is finally taking off. the dog has his path so nothing is going grow there.
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Huntn

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Interesting article for anyone who might want to make a home made liquid fertilizer:


Ferns are tough, have always been a favorite of mine. The housing development we lived in Minnesota (southern Twin Cites suburbs) I used to visit woodsy vacant lots about to be bulldozed to build a house and rescue the ferns for my own woodsy backyard. :)
 

fooferdoggie

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Interesting article for anyone who might want to make a home made liquid fertilizer:



Ferns are tough, have always been a favorite of mine. The housing development we lived in Minnesota (southern Twin Cites suburbs) I used to visit woodsy vacant lots about to be bulldozed to build a house and rescue the ferns for my own woodsy backyard. :)
some can be wimps though. my wife can't grow them in the house at all. orchids yes ferns no. well this fern growing in a orchid pot of course
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Huntn

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here is a really cool Prickly pear verbiage and no needles. grows like a weed a wonderful house cactus.
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No needles? Natural or genetically modified? Have some bad memories of prickly pears... SERE training, diving off a road to avoid an enemy patrol right into some cactus. ;)
 

Huntn

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some can be wimps though. my wife can't grow them in the house at all. orchids yes ferns no. well this fern growing in a orchid pot of course
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Ferns don’t like low humidity. In Minnesota we used to over winter our deck Boston ferns in the Dining Room West facing window and by the end of the winter, they were very sad. Outside, they are troopers.
 

fooferdoggie

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Ferns don’t like low humidity. In Minnesota we used to over winter our deck Boston ferns in the Dining Room West facing window and by the end of the winter, they were very sad. Outside, they are troopers.
not an issue here in portland and our house. I think too much light.
 

lizkat

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Ferns don’t like low humidity. In Minnesota we used to over winter our deck Boston ferns in the Dining Room West facing window and by the end of the winter, they were very sad. Outside, they are troopers.

My grandma used to overwinter her Boston ferns in a spare bedroom, in a 3"-tall galvanized tray about 4' x 6' that was filled with pebbles and that she kept about an inch of water in to provide some local moisture. Most ferns are pretty fussy about dry air indoors.
Outside though, wow. I remember in 2012 we had an especially rainy summer here, and these guys popped up outta nowhere next to an in-law's place and really took off. I loved them and managed to transplant a few out to a low spot in the back of my place where they'd have a better chance no matter the local rainfall levels. They didn't very much like being transplanted, as I recall, but enough of their spores settled in there over the season changes that year, so I have nice ferns out back now most years.

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Huntn

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My grandma used to overwinter her Boston ferns in a spare bedroom, in a 3"-tall galvanized tray about 4' x 6' that was filled with pebbles and that she kept about an inch of water in to provide some local moisture. Most ferns are pretty fussy about dry air indoors.
Outside though, wow. I remember in 2012 we had an especially rainy summer here, and these guys popped up outta nowhere next to an in-law's place and really took off. I loved them and managed to transplant a few out to a low spot in the back of my place where they'd have a better chance no matter the local rainfall levels. They didn't very much like being transplanted, as I recall, but enough of their spores settled in there over the season changes that year, so I have nice ferns out back now most years.

They are invasive but easily controlled. :) They seem to tolerate a wide range of temps from cold to hot. Our ferns here in Houston look like the same ferns we had in Minnesota.
 
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