Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

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Scepticalscribe

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The weather is filthy, cold, wet, dark, dreary, dismal.

Thus, today - well, I have been deferring or putting it off for a few days - seemed a good idea to try to prepare a warming dish of chilli.

Sautéed diced stewing beef (organic, etc, but defrosted - originally, I had thought I was defrosting actual steak, not stewing steak, tant pis, never mind) until brown; that meant browning in batches, and not crowding the pan.

Anyway, the browned steak was returned to the pan, where it was seasoned with sea salt, black pepper, brown sugar, ground cumin, ground coriander, and generous quantities of chilli - pimentón - (dulce) sweet, smoked, Spanish chilli, and its hotter cousin, picante; this was returned - with the pan juices - to the copper casserole dish, along with stock, tomao puree, and a tin of Italian San Marzano tomatoes.

This lot then went into a preheated oven, at a low enough temperature for two and a half hours.

At that stage, I checked the liquid, and added a mug of strong black (Ethiopian, because I have nothing else, but would have used central American coffee if I had it to hand,) coffee, with a spoon of brown sugar.

The casserole was returned to the oven for a further hour, while, on the stove top, on a low heat, eight small onions (I would have used three or four large onions, if I had them, but, pre-Christmas shortages - for reasons well known to all, but connected with severed transport links due to both Covid and Brexit in the weeks immediately preceding Christmas - of standard sized organic onions meant my purchases in the farmers' market before Christmas were confined to small onions)- roughly chopped - onions were gently sautéed; when they were soft, a minced head of garlic (nine fat cloves) was added to the copper sauté pan.

These - the softened and sautéed onions and garlic - were then added to the chilli casserole where they will cheerfully cook for a further hour, at a low heat, at which point I shall add the kidney beans, and return the casserole to the oven for a further - and final - twenty minutes to half an hour.

There will be more than enough for seconds tomorrow, which I shall probably serve with rice.
 
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Scepticalscribe

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The weather is filthy, cold, wet, dark, dreary, dismal.

Thus, today - well, I have been deferring or putting it off for a few days - seemed a good idea to try to prepare a warming dish of chilli.

Sautéed diced stewing beef (organic, etc, but defrosted - originally, I had thought I was defrosting actual steak, not stewing steak, tant pis, never mind) until brown; that meant browning in batches, and not crowding the pan.

Anyway, the browned steak was returned to the pan, where it was seasoned with sea salt, black pepper, brown sugar, ground cumin, ground coriander, and generous quantities of chilli - pimentón - (dulce) sweet, smoked, Spanish chilli, and its hotter cousin, picante; this was returned - with the pan juices - to the copper casserole dish, along with stock, tomao puree, and a tin of Italian San Marzano tomatoes.

This lot then went into a preheated oven, at a low enough temperature for two and a half hours.

At that stage, I checked the liquid, and added a mug of strong black (Ethiopian, because I have nothing else, but would have used central American coffee if I had it to hand,) coffee, with a spoon of brown sugar.

The casserole was returned to the oven for a further hour, while, on the stove top, on a low heat, eight small onions (I would have used three or four large onions, if I had them, but, pre-Christmas shortages - for reasons well known to all, but connected with severed transport links due to both Covid and Brexit in the weeks immediately preceding Christmas - of standard sized organic onions meant my purchases in the farmers' market before Christmas were confined to small onions)- roughly chopped - onions were gently sautéed; when they were soft, a minced head of garlic (nine fat cloves) was added to the copper sauté pan.

These - the softened and sautéed onions and garlic - were then added to the chilli casserole where they will cheerfully cook for a further hour, at a low heat, at which point I shall add the kidney beans, and return the casserole to the oven for a further - and final - twenty minutes to half an hour.

There will be more than enough for seconds tomorrow, which I shall probably serve with rice.

Dinner was absolutely delicious, though I say so, myself.
 

Scepticalscribe

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I shall have yesterday's chilli tomorrow.

Meanwhile, dinner this evening took the form of free range, organic, fried eggs, (delicious), and dessert was sliced mangoes (I had two to use up).

Simple but very tasty.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Dinner was my take on, or version of, Chinese style egg fried rice: Finely chopped carrots, onions (both organic), sautéed in butter (and a little olive oil), until soft, seasoned with freshly ground black pepper; then, a head of minced (organic) garlic was added, then a half mug (Le Crueset) of frozen peas and some sliced French onions.

Once they were soft, I added two eggs (free range, organic, and already whisked) to this mix, and scrambled them through it; then, the day old basmati rice was added, and sautéed and stirred and mixed through.

This was when the seasoning - to taste - was added, along with more chopped French onions: Soya sauce, oyster sauce, a little kecap manis, and some sesame oil.

Then serve and tuck in.

Very tasty, I must say.
 
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Clix Pix

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On Nikon Cafe, where I also hang out, someone who is very into cooking posted photos of the latest meal he prepared for himself and his wife: Gnudi. Many of us reading and responding to the thread had never heard of Gnudi. It's an Italian dish rather similar to Gnocchi, featuring ricotta cheese, but without the pasta. Sounds interesting and I thought since you enjoy cooking different things you might enjoy this, if you are unfamiliar with it..... There are plenty of recipes available on the internet. Bon Appetit!
 
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