Breakfast/lunch/Dinner, what are you having?

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Scepticalscribe

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Today, dinner shall comprise of poached turkey thighs (organic, free range, etc) with roasted root vegetables (for the most part) - beets, sweet potato, carrots, parsnip, onions, a few heads of garlic, but maybe also with a few tomatoes, as well.
 

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Today, dinner shall comprise of poached turkey thighs (organic, free range, etc) with roasted root vegetables (for the most part) - beets, sweet potato, carrots, parsnip, onions, a few heads of garlic, but maybe also with a few tomatoes, as well.

Dinner was delicious, though I say so myself.
 

hulugu

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A few recipes:

First, took chicken and sautéed it until the skin was seared and crispy. Removed that and cooked onions and garlic with white wine, threw in some kale and cooked for a bit. Then, added Navy beans. Chucked all that into the oven with the chicken on top for a bit.

Second, took leftover ham bone from Christmas and cooked it in water until the marrow came out. Removed bone and liquid, and then cooked carrots, onions, garlic and shallots. Added in potatoes, salt and pepper. Then, leftover ham. Cooked for bit. Added frozen corn. And, then added milk and flour to thicken. Made a really solid ham chowder.

Third, took some leftover corn tortillas that were too dry and cracked for tacos and fried them to make homemade chips. Added in some chicken, and leftover chiles and tomatoes, and made nachos.

Last night, the wifey and I made egg nog and (I probably) screwed up the ratios, so we ended up getting slightly blitzed.

Otherwise, we've been eating Christmas tamales, and other leftovers for the last couple of days.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Dinner will be basmati rice (in the rice cooker, but using turkey stock from yesterday), ramen noodles (in turkey stock), and what is left from yesterday's roasted vegetables.

I plan to prepare Indonesian rice tomorrow.
 

lizkat

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Lunch was fancy tuna salad (well sorta fancy, with added scallions and some carrot grated through the larger holes on the grater, with usual blitz of India relish, mayo, celery and a touch of mustard but then blasted into spicy territory with a little sriracha) served up in toasted pita halves. Could do that again and probably will repeat it now and then in defiance of the idea that all snowy days are meant to house only things like stews and soups for lunch.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Lunch was fancy tuna salad (well sorta fancy, with added scallions and some carrot grated through the larger holes on the grater, with usual blitz of India relish, mayo, celery and a touch of mustard but then blasted into spicy territory with a little sriracha) served up in toasted pita halves. Could do that again and probably will repeat it now and then in defiance of the idea that all snowy days are meant to house only things like stews and soups for lunch.

I have discovered sriracha only this year (and - by now, thanks to a well stocked Asian store - I have both the standard red bottle of sriracha and sriracha mayo - has anyone any experience with the green bottle of sriracha, and what is that like?) and must admit that it is quite unexpectedly wonderful.
 

lizkat

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I have discovered sriracha only this year (and - by now, thanks to a well stocked Asian store - I have both the standard red bottle of sriracha and sriracha mayo - has anyone any experience with the green bottle of sriracha, and what is that like?) and must admit that it is quite unexpectedly wonderful.

I've not had the green kind of sriracha. Is it milder or just different? I was even late to discovery of green jalapeño sauce and I like that a lot for a switchup sometimes to the red tabasco that I put in some soups. The green is milder and I use it more on taco fillings or over lunch dishes I've made of some kind of pilaf and "whatever" veggies struck me as the right thing to serve over or in.
 

Scepticalscribe

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I've not had the green kind of sriracha. Is it milder or just different? I was even late to discovery of green jalapeño sauce and I like that a lot for a switchup sometimes to the red tabasco that I put in some soups. The green is milder and I use it more on taco fillings or over lunch dishes I've made of some kind of pilaf and "whatever" veggies struck me as the right thing to serve over or in.

I've just googled their website and it seems to suggest that the green (flying Goose) sriracha (these are all stocked by an excellent Asian store in the city centre) is a bit hotter - green chillies! - than is the standard red bottle (which is amazing).

Must stock up on pitta halves; very, very handy to have to hand for the days when you have run out of bread.
 
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lizkat

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I've just googled their website and it seems to suggest that the green (flying Goose) sriracha (these are all stocked by an excellent Asian store in the city centre) is a bit hotter - green chillies! - than is the standard red bottle (which is amazing).

Thanks... and so next time I'm shopping remotely I'll see if there's green sriracha via my Instacart options. Otherwise it will be on the list for shopping at an Asian market in Ithaca.

As for pita, I do try to keep those on hand. I buy them fresh a dozen at a time and freeze them double-wrapped in 4-packs to fit them into the freezer wherever I can. I like to have fish or egg salad in pita, instead of using the bread that I want to keep on hand for things like grilled cheese sandwiches. And as I like hummus, I serve that with pita for lunch pretty often.

Heh there is of course a limit, and for me pita's usefulness falls well short of "toasted, torn up and parked under poached eggs with hot milk poured over." But I've grown used to having pitas around as a near substitute for yeast-raised breads in a lot of other situations.
 

hulugu

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Lunch was fancy tuna salad (well sorta fancy, with added scallions and some carrot grated through the larger holes on the grater, with usual blitz of India relish, mayo, celery and a touch of mustard but then blasted into spicy territory with a little sriracha) served up in toasted pita halves. Could do that again and probably will repeat it now and then in defiance of the idea that all snowy days are meant to house only things like stews and soups for lunch.

Those rules are meant to be broken. A "warm salad" for lunch on a cold day can be great, and I'll regularly eat caldo during the summer. Now, a good bowl of menudo or posole on a cold winter day is a joy.

I have discovered sriracha only this year (and - by now, thanks to a well stocked Asian store - I have both the standard red bottle of sriracha and sriracha mayo - has anyone any experience with the green bottle of sriracha, and what is that like?) and must admit that it is quite unexpectedly wonderful.
I've always enjoyed green chile, so I really like the new sriracha.
 

Scepticalscribe

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Green chili sauce is the shiznit.

Although I had guessed (correctly) from the context what this expression meant, I had to look it up for confirmation.

You learn something new every day, or, at least, you hope to.

Anyway, I'm equally glad to recieve confirmation of just how good the green chilli sriracha is.
I've always enjoyed green chile, so I really like the new sriracha.

Excellent.

I shall add a bottle to my basket on my next visit (Covid constraints permitting) to the Asian store in the city.
 

Scepticalscribe

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The well-stocked contents of a cheeseboard, and toasted rye bread: Stilton, Bleu d'Auvergne, Gorgonzola Cremosa, Camembert Rustique, Taleggio, St Nectaire, Abondance, aged Comte.
 

DT

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Today, dinner shall comprise of poached turkey thighs (organic, free range, etc)

Turkey thighs are just glorious, the meat is dense, rich, it tastes like duck.

I think, at least in the US, people consider the thigh, especially a chicken thigh, kind of the "cheap" part. We also get boneless, skinless chicken thighs and prepare them like wings :D

OK, so back to turkey thighs, super inexpensive, incredibly delicious, here's a so simple you won't believe the result recipe:

Take turkey thighs, rub with some olive oil, salt, pepper, place into a slow cooker (aka, "crock pot"), on low, cook for several hours. That's right, no additional liquid, just the low, slow heat, almost like a convection cook.

Then slice the meat in long, parallel-to-the-bone cuts, just amazing.
 

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Turkey thighs are just glorious, the meat is dense, rich, it tastes like duck.

I think, at least in the US, people consider the thigh, especially a chicken thigh, kind of the "cheap" part. We also get boneless, skinless chicken thighs and prepare them like wings :D

OK, so back to turkey thighs, super inexpensive, incredibly delicious, here's a so simple you won't believe the result recipe:

Take turkey thighs, rub with some olive oil, salt, pepper, place into a slow cooker (aka, "crock pot"), on low, cook for several hours. That's right, no additional liquid, just the low, slow heat, almost like a convection cook.

Then slice the meat in long, parallel-to-the-bone cuts, just amazing.

Agreed.

Actually, I have never liked, or cared for, the meat from the breast, of either a chicken or a turkey, - too dry (even when roasted) and lacking in flavour - but I love that favoursome, juicy, rich, dark meat from the thigh of both birds, and - by choice - that is what I will always buy.
 

hulugu

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Agreed.

Actually, I have never liked, or cared for, the meat from the breast, of either a chicken or a turkey, - too dry (even when roasted) and lacking in flavour - but I love that favoursome, juicy, rich, dark meat from the thigh of both birds, and - by choice - that is what I will always buy.

I feel like I'm pretty good at getting good flavor and moistness from a well-roasted chicken, but it requires a good cooking method and brining. I tend to think that most people are overcooking chicken.

I like marinading chicken in buttermilk, based on Samin Nosrat's recipe. For turkey, it must be brined for a day, usually using vegetable stocks and lots of salt and spices.

I also like to lean into the Sonoran styles of carne seca, or dried beef, which can also be done with chicken. This requires a lot of spice, and once it's made, complimentary flavors, so it's not all dried food, but rather a complex layer of flavors.
 

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I feel like I'm pretty good at getting good flavor and moistness from a well-roasted chicken, but it requires a good cooking method and brining. I tend to think that most people are overcooking chicken.

I like marinading chicken in buttermilk, based on Samin Nosrat's recipe. For turkey, it must be brined for a day, usually using vegetable stocks and lots of salt and spices.

I also like to lean into the Sonoran styles of carne seca, or dried beef, which can also be done with chicken. This requires a lot of spice, and once it's made, complimentary flavors, so it's not all dried food, but rather a complex layer of flavors.

For roasting a chicken, I use Nigel Slater's recipe (stuffed with lemons), generously anointed with olive oil and lemon juice (and oranges and garlic); the chicken is delicious on the day I cook it, - I usually serve it with gratin potatoes, or roasted potatoes, and a green salad, - but (if any is left over), the breast meat can be a bit dry the following day. Nothing that cannot be cured in a spicy sandwich.
 

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Dinner was simple, yet tasty: Scrambled eggs (free range, organic, to which sea salt, a few twists of black pepper, and a few dessertspoons of organic, double cream were added, all whisked together before being added to the sauté pan, Italian, copper, in which butter had already melted) and toasted (French) rye bread.
 

lizkat

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Slowly sautéed sliced cabbage, julienned carrots, sliced onions, then some diamonds of firm silken tofu added with teriyaki sauce over, mixed gently and simmered a few moments, then served on a simple chicken broth-based rice pilaf. A few scallion tops diced up for a garnish.
 
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