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JayMysteri0

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Scepticalscribe

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Too little, too late. Their enabling led to Capitol police being murdered by beating to death... by the exact people they’ve been courting and riling up. I hope this kills the GOP once and for all.

I agree, but the strength of their repudiation (ganted, at the very last possible minute) is interesting.

More interesting still, is the interview with James Comey discussed (and quoted) in today's Guardian.
 

lizkat

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Too little, too late. Their enabling led to Capitol police being murdered by beating to death... by the exact people they’ve been courting and riling up. I hope this kills the GOP once and for all.

In the insurrection at the Capitol what we saw ...aside from some organized puppet masters along to see what they could make of Trump's dupes, was mass political opinion molded by Donald Trump into authoritarian following of himself as a forceful personality, not as the standard bearer of his party.

Ironically that may have been both the culmination and the seeds of self-destruction of Trump himself as the GOP's nominal leader, as McConnell is now forcing Republicans in Congress to recognize Trump's treachery and so "choose a side" within the party.

Mitch usually has a vote count in hand and head before he is as forceful in speaking as he was today. The never-Trumpers of the GOP right now do mean to preview their intent to bury a certain Caesar even before he wends his way from the Oval to Mar-a-Lago.
 

Scepticalscribe

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In the insurrection at the Capitol what we saw ...aside from some organized puppet masters along to see what they could make of Trump's dupes, was mass political opinion molded by Donald Trump into authoritarian following of himself as a forceful personality, not as the standard bearer of his party.

Ironically that may have been both the culmination and the seeds of self-destruction of Trump himself as the GOP's nominal leader, as McConnell is now forcing Republicans in Congress to recognize Trump's treachery and so "choose a side" within the party.

Mitch usually has a vote count in hand and head before he is as forceful in speaking as he was today. The never-Trumpers of the GOP right now do mean to preview their intent to bury a certain Caesar even before he wends his way from the Oval to Mar-a-Lago.

I think that it is looking increasingly likely that Donald Trump over-played his hand on January 6.

I doubt that the distancing would have been quite so pronounced had January 6 not occurred.

And, while I do think it is too little, too late, I also think that the fact that both Mike Pence and Mitch McConnell found themselves under actual physical threat that day (along with every other legislator), along with the fact that Donald Trump subsequently showed scant concern or regard for their welfare and wellbeing, may have concentrated their minds as to the intensity of their (belated) attachment to democratic (small "d", lower case "d") principles and ideals.

But, in the wake of January 6, I do think that their clear dislike of, and distaste for, Donald Trump is probably genuine. At the end of the day, their loyalty counted for nothing to him, and, in his eyes, they were utterly expendable. I daresay they both did some serious thinking in the days that followed.
 

Eraserhead

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I think that it is looking increasingly likely that Donald Trump over-played his hand on January 6.

I doubt that the distancing would have been quite so pronounced had January 6 not occurred.

And, while I do think it is too little, too late, I also think that the fact that both Mike Pence and Mitch McConnell found themselves under actual physical threat that day (along with every other legislator), along with the fact that Donald Trump subsequently showed scant concern or regard for their welfare and wellbeing, may have concentrated their minds as to the intensity of their (belated) attachment to democratic (small "d", lower case "d") principles and ideals.

But, in the wake of January 6, I do think that their clear dislike of, and distaste for, Donald Trump is probably genuine. At the end of the day, their loyalty counted for nothing to him, and, in his eyes, they were utterly expendable. I daresay they both did some serious thinking in the days that followed.
Business is fine with Republican games as long as they don’t break through to the general public and aren’t just noticed by political junkies on Twitter.

The coup attempt broke through and will likely be included in school history textbooks in years to come.

EDIT I see Wikipedia has a section on this already on the main US history page - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States#2020_election
 

JayMysteri0

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Teespring, a Silicon Valley e-commerce site that lets people create and sell customized T-shirts, sweaters, and other apparel, is having a heck of a month.

Two weeks ago the company apologized to the Polish Auschwitz Memorial Holocaust museum after Internet sleuths discovered a Teespring user was selling “Camp Auschwitz” shirts identical to the now-infamous hoodie sported by a Virginia terrorist who stormed the U.S. Capitol on January 6.

Now a prolific hacker group called ShinyHunters has just leaked over 8 million user records from the company, dumping them onto a publicly accessible cybercrime forum called RaidForums. The data, apparently came from a June Teespring hack, includes email addresses, “usernames, real names, phone numbers, home addresses, and Facebook and OpenID identifiers users used to log into their accounts,” but not email passwords. Gizmodo has independently verified these claims.
 

JayMysteri0

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Who could have seen this coming? Oh, yeah, anyone.

Former President Donald Trump's return to his glitzy Mar-a-Lago resort is said to have been met with little fanfare by the club's wealthy members.

In fact, the author of a book on the Florida resort says that the mood is "dispirited" and that people are canceling their memberships.

"I've talked to a bunch of people the last couple of days," the author Laurence Leamer told MSNBC. "A lot of people have quit Mar-a-Lago."

Leamer, who wrote "Mar-a-Lago: Inside the Gates of Power at Donald Trump's Presidential Palace," then remarked that members were leaving over concerns they might be featured in newspaper articles.

Leamer said Trump's declining popularity had turned off members.

"They don't want anything to do with Donald Trump," he said. "Many of the members, they're not going there very often because it's a very dispirited place."

He continued: "It's a sad place for Trump to be hanging out. It's not what it was."

Leamer later added: "They're walking away from him. Even here, people don't like him."

Members, who pay $200,000 to join the club, have voiced their concern about Trump's return to Mar-a-Lago.

Some of his neighbors last year began taking legal action to try to prevent the move from becoming permanent, according to The Washington Post.
 
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